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Under the ACPA, a trademark owner may bring a cause of action against a domain name registrant who Has a bad faith intent to profit from the mark Registers, traffics in, or uses a domain name that is Identical or confusingly similar to a distinctive mark Identical or confusingly similar to or dilutive of a famous mark Is a trademark ...


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This is called cybersquatting - when you own a trademark and the other registrant has registered the domain in bad faith. There are means for resolving these matters. I have not been able to find any laws specific to the United Kingdom, however there are other laws and agreements this falls under. However, the respondent (the person owning the domain in ...


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This question really depends on the specific countries involved, as all law depends on jurisdiction. However, there are essentially two ways that breaking into foreign computer systems could be illegal: 1) Your own country has laws against hacking that include hacking into foreign computers or 2) The country you're breaking into has laws about hacking that ...


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If you suspect or should reasonably suspect that the customer will violate the license agreement to do something illegal, then the license will not protect you. Use common sense. If Walmart hires you to write software to check the security of their 100,000 cash registers, you can do that, and if one rogue employee uses the software to commit a crime, that'...


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As domain names are international and ran by the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, the trademark part does not always come into effect. Cyber squatting can still occur without a U.S. Trademark. If a company is somename and you own somename.com they have the option to dispute that with ICANN. https://www.icann.org/resources/pages/dndr-2012-...


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This is specifically addressing Q2 about ICANN. Unfortunately I don't think you can do anything about the domain without a court order. ICANN doesn't actually handle disputes itself; you make any complaint to the domain registrar, which you can find using the "whois" service. The registrar will have a dispute policy, which will probably be the ICANN one. ...


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Taking the site offline might infringe First Amendment rights (freedom of expression). Instead, the remedies for damages to your reputation are in the form of a claim of defamation. But your attorney needs to be mindful of the deadline (called the statute of limitations) to file a defamation lawsuit. I have seen several defamation cases fail on appeal simply ...


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Profit should probably not be taken too literally in this case. "Profit from the goodwill of" could also reasonable be interpreted to mean "benefit from" even without monetary gain, because the publicity associated with someone's trademark has money value even though it isn't in the form of money. Also, keep in mind that, in general, a celebrity's name is ...


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15 U.S.C. 1125, opens one up to civil action by the owner of the mark if with "a bad faith intent to profit from that mark" one "registers, traffics in, or uses a domain name". Also, it does not matter what goods and services are provided by the parties, since the law specifically disregards that element of "similarity". As long as you do nothing with the ...


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