26

The goal of the GDPR is to ensure a single market for personal data processing throughout the EU. Since all EU/EEA member states now have equivalent levels of data protection, it doesn't matter in which member state data is stored or processed. Member states cannot generally limit this single market via national laws. Furthermore, secure processing may be ...


10

Art. 17 GDPR Right to erasure (‘right to be forgotten’) The data subject shall have the right to obtain from the controller the erasure of personal data concerning him or her without undue delay and the controller shall have the obligation to erase personal data without undue delay where one of the following grounds applies: Assuming ...


5

No, a company cannot suspend your GDPR rights – contracts can't override the law. Your rights as a data subject apply as long as your personal data is being processed. However, there is no requirement in the GDPR that they fulfill your data subject rights through a self-service mechanism like a “download my data” button. They can require you to use another ...


4

Where can the patient report this infraction of the HIPAA requirements? You file a complaint with the Office for Civil Rights (OCR). If you believe that a covered entity or business associate violated your (or someone else’s) health information privacy rights or committed another violation of the Privacy, Security or Breach Notification Rules, you ...


4

Data, as it happens in law, can also be owned. That's why we have a discipline called "Intellectual Property". It is a "thing" - like other properties like cars, houses etc., someone owns it. Now, does the transfer of a computer also includes a transfer of data ownership stored inside the computer? Practically speaking, this clause is very unlikely to be ...


4

You can't own a database; you might, however, own (have) the copyright to a database if you created it or the creator transferred that right to you. You can also possess a copy of a database: the question is whether it is legal. "Leaked" implies that it is taken without permission, so you might be in violation of copyright law by possessing a copy. The only ...


4

Yes, this violates the GDPR if the user is in Europe. Data which is tied to a personal device can be tied to the person who owns it. From "What Is Personal Data" by the UK Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) (emphasis added): Personal data is information that relates to an identified or identifiable individual. What identifies an individual ...


4

Whether published or unpublished, they are still protected by copyright. (They are probably unpublished for copyright purposes, but in the US this makes little difference for any recently created work (that is anything after 2002). For older work see the Cornell chart.) They cannot be copied or distributed without permission, unless an exception to ...


4

Why would the method by which you transfer a item that has a copyright impact the copyright? You buy a new book at a new bookstore, a used book at a used bookstore, a used book at a garage sale, someone gives you a book, you find a book on the sidewalk, you steal a book from a store, you buy and download an ebook, you give an ebook to someone on a USB stick, ...


4

You're misreading the law. You need to keep reading the section you referenced (emphasis added): The disclosure...shall be made in writing and delivered through the consumer’s account with the business, if the consumer maintains an account with the business, or by mail or electronically at the consumer’s option if the consumer does not maintain an account ...


3

18 U.S. Code § 2252 defines a crime and punishment for knowingly transporting, or reproducing for distribution by any means, visual depictions involving the use of a minor engaging in sexually explicit conduct. Here are some sample jury instructions that rephrase this and give definitions for each of these terms. Here are some others (at p. 469). This law ...


3

My remarks pertain only to US Law. Laws vary in other countries. Subject matter eligible for copyright protection in the US must be expressive and creative. To the extent data are merely measurements of observable fact in the world, they are not copyrightable. It may be that the presentation or interpretation of data is eligible for copyright protection (...


3

If you have no knowledge and can't possibly have knowledge because the data is totally private, you should fall into the safe harbor protection of 17 U.S. Code § 512 - Limitations on liability relating to material online. See this answer here which covers a lot of the information you are looking for: Legality of Proxy sites and DMCA


3

It seems that you have a valid contract and he has breached it. You could sue for the value of a year's hosting in a small claims court. Whether this is worth the effort ...


3

The CEO wants to "fool" users You are essentially admitting that the company you are working for is about to deceit its customers and asking whether that is legal. The relevant set of laws is rather sparse and does not give direct answers in regards to oAuth tokens or other details of that level (which is probably making your CEO think he can "handle" the ...


3

Legalities What is being proposed is illegal in most jurisdictions and particularly so if any of your users is in the EU or an EU citizen. All jurisdictions I know of have a law that prohibits businesses from engaging in deceptive or misleading conduct; in most cases irrespective of intent. Deliberately setting out to "fool" your customers is a textbook ...


3

No. This is governed by the HIPAA Security Rule which was a regulation that the HIPAA statute required the Department of Health and Human Services to adopt. The Rule does require someone covered by HIPAA to have a "Business Associate Agreement" (BAA) and a Service Level Agreement (SLA) with any cloud storage provider (which would be the usual way that a U.S....


3

At least as of 2011, when regulations under the Information Technology Act related to privacy and data security were issued (some of the relevant statute sections and regulations are linked in this answer at Law.SE), there was no non-contractual right to have your data destroyed, although a terms of service for a site could give you that right contractually. ...


3

"I am accessing the data through various API's that I have found through my research. All of the API's are free to use." The API's you "found" and are using may be "free" in a monetary sense - i.e., you don't pay for them and they appear to be public information - but those APIs will have a Terms of Service (TOS) attached to the use of the APIs and the ...


3

It depends on how you got the right to participate in the event. Let us assume that you "sign up" for the event, and agree to certain conditions in exchange for being allowed to participate. In that case, there could be a condition prohibiting you from tracking the route, or publicizing the track: you have to read what the agreement says. Agreement might be ...


3

I live in the EU and Facebook has blocked access to my account unless I accept their privacy rules, which means giving up GDPR protections. Facebook operates in the EU and has EU data subjects, therefore Facebook is subject to GDPR. You should be able to withdraw your consent. Article 7(3) says: The data subject shall have the right to withdraw his or ...


3

I very much suspect she is in right to 1) no receive promotion emails anymore, 2) Have them close the account again and 3) have them delete her pictures. No, she does not have those rights. She agreed to a legally binding contract when she signed up for the service when she clicked "OK" to open the account. That contract outlines her "rights," as you ...


3

An employer owns the data on a cell phone provided to its employee if the employer has made that a condition of employment. The employer might own the data independently (e.g. the employer created it). Or, the employer might own it if the employee created it in the course of their employment. It's not where the data is that determines ownership, it's who ...


3

We cannot dispense personalized legal advice: that is what your attorney is for. However, I agree with your analysis that this is most likely covered by fair use, and indeed it is not obvious that you have taken anything that is protected. There is no creativity behind a number such as entries in the "I did N pushups" column. The arrangement of ...


3

It's not illegal to ask. Whether they can give it to you, and under what circumstances, is another, much more complicated matter. For instance, if the database contains health information covered by HIPAA in the United States, or personal information covered by laws like GDPR or CCPA, the customer's ability to share the database may be restricted, either ...


2

It all comes down to the ToS you agreed to when you signed up with the host, or any changes made later. If it was in your ToS it is likely that they would have a fee for the time it takes. If it isn't mentioned then they would either refuse or request a fee as it does cost to have staff carryout work.


2

Your jurisdiction's laws and your concerns may vary slightly or significantly depending on where you are, so it would be wise to ask a local attorney. In the United States, most legal concerns would be addressed if a company doing that were to (1) check with an industry body about whether industry practice allows that, (2) include a note of explanation ...


2

Based on your description, it may not be property. Let us say that the IP in question is acoustic readings from sending sound waves into the ground (revealing huge oil reserves). I also assume that you are certain that this IP fell through the cracks and there was no official transfer. That table of data could be subject to copyright restrictions, so that ...


2

Yes, you did something wrong; you used both the university's trade mark and copyright without their permission. I don't know the law in India, however, if it is similar to Australia it is unlikely that the police will be interested in doing anything about it. While it is technically a crime, criminal prosecution is usually reserved for egregious breaches on ...


2

In the United States, you can't copyright something like a phone book that is just a collection of records sorted in an obvious manner. According to the US copyright office, you can't copyright a recipe either: Copyright law does not protect recipes that are mere listings of ingredients. Nor does it protect other mere listings of ingredients such ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible