4

Why would the method by which you transfer a item that has a copyright impact the copyright? You buy a new book at a new bookstore, a used book at a used bookstore, a used book at a garage sale, someone gives you a book, you find a book on the sidewalk, you steal a book from a store, you buy and download an ebook, you give an ebook to someone on a USB stick, ...


4

Whether published or unpublished, they are still protected by copyright. (They are probably unpublished for copyright purposes, but in the US this makes little difference for any recently created work (that is anything after 2002). For older work see the Cornell chart.) They cannot be copied or distributed without permission, unless an exception to ...


3

An employer owns the data on a cell phone provided to its employee if the employer has made that a condition of employment. The employer might own the data independently (e.g. the employer created it). Or, the employer might own it if the employee created it in the course of their employment. It's not where the data is that determines ownership, it's who ...


3

I very much suspect she is in right to 1) no receive promotion emails anymore, 2) Have them close the account again and 3) have them delete her pictures. No, she does not have those rights. She agreed to a legally binding contract when she signed up for the service when she clicked "OK" to open the account. That contract outlines her "rights," as you ...


2

You want to exercise your right to erasure under the GDPR. The link is to the UK Information Comissioner's Office, which is a good source of authoritative information about the GDPR. Note that in these quotes "you" is the organisation holding the data. The GDPR does not specify how to make a valid request. Therefore, an individual can make a request for ...


2

Non-Personal data defines that that can't be traced to certain people/entities. By that definition it doesn't matters how much non-personal data you accumulate, you won't be able to create personal data from it. Do companies, on the basis of law, need to analyze the possibility of personal data being generated from non-personal data processed in it? No, ...


2

These are just facts, reported by the program, and not someone's creative product, so it is not protected by copyright. The data might contain a word that coincides with a trademark, but that probably doesn't matter. Registering a name as a trademark doesn't mean that you have absolute ownership of that word, it means you have control over its use in the ...


2

It is still "breaking the law". Any unauthorized copying is a violation of copyright law. It is presumably also a breach of contract. The copyright restriction is not limited to "and then using or sharing". Nor are sanctions resulting from breach of contract limited by the fact that you did not "use or share". The "did not use or share" consideration would ...


1

One source of such a requirement would be contractual: A provides access to B pursuant to a contract, and the contract requires A to observe certain standards. A second source would be direct regulation, following certain statutes. HIPAA (in particular the Privacy Rule) applies to healthcare providers, but also "Where provided, the standards, requirements, ...


1

Let me start by saying based on your posted information it is a breach of GDPR. Well, do not take this wrong, yet to answer your question I have to play the "devil's advocate" role. 1st, machine learning = automated processing (meaning the Data Subject must be informed and be entitled to opt-out) then "... predicting mortality rates (...) of, for example, ...


1

I know this is a old question but I saw it and thought to just answer it. Facebook says that the message is deleted from the servers (only if both parties remove a message). And then I was thinking, why? As part of GDPR the part where it states: (a) the personal data are no longer necessary in relation to the purposes for which they were collected or ...


1

Under the GDPR, a resident of the EU now has the right to have data about him- or herself deleted, or anonymized, subject to certain exceptions. (that was not true when this question was first posted.) The GDPR asserts this right as against any entity that processes personal data, anywhere. It is not yet clear whether, and if so how, this right can be ...


1

is there any legal problem with Google (and loads of others with large amounts of user data) actively investing/trading based on this data? No. By way of analogy, consider a scenario where many, many random people in the street casually tell you that they are about to purchase a Tesla vehicle. There would be no legal impediment for you to buy Tesla shares ...


1

Yes You’re right that it isn’t ‘insider trading’ - the correct name for it is ‘market research’ and that’s totally legal.


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