New answers tagged

1

The common law defence of Reportage specifically allows newspapers to do this exact thing: Where they reveal the name/identity of a person facing allegations even before that person has been charged or found guilty of those allegations In the UK, the Defamation Act 2013 maintains this defence by combining into the defence of a Publication on a Matter of ...


1

The court 'lists' of cases will contain at minimum each defendant’s name, age, address, his profession when known and the alleged offence. In the interests of the principle of 'open justice' and accurate reporting (e.g. distinguishing individuals with similar names) the newspaper is free to publish the defendant's name, address and alleged offences unless ...


0

If you have personal details of the scammer, hand them to the police. But it is very very unlikely that the personal details are those of the scammer. So don’t even think about publishing anything online because the innocent person you libelled may take costly action against you. Personal experience: I once got a scam email that had myself as the sender.


1

This might be an unnecessary subtle point, but the goal of the GDPR isn't to protect personal data as some abstract concept – it regulates how personal data can be processed. For an organisation's compliance obligations, it matters for what purposes they collect and process personal data. You can't shove sensitive personal data on an unsuspecting recipient ...


1

Password fields are the least of your worries, actually. You shouldn't be storing passwords anyway, and the type of processing you should be doing on them (salt & hashing) is not covered under the GDPR. But your more general problem is indeed a real concern. However, the impact here is limited. Such a "general" field wouldn't be subject to specific ...


1

Yes You are confusing personal data with data that can identify a person Any data that is connected to a person is personal data: my friends list on Facebook, the record of the tweets I’ve viewed on Twitter, my recently watched video list on YouTube, and, yes, my password on any given website. None of that data on its own may be able to identify me but if ...


0

You have to comply with the law everywhere you operate If you have US, NZ or Iraqi customers (knowingly or not) you have to comply with the laws of the US, NZ and Iraq.


1

Any website or app potentially has access to personal data. You decide how this data will be processed, so you are a Data Controller and must comply with the GDPR This includes obligations such as providing privacy policy style information and assessing potential risks for your users. If you are not using any of the data you have access to, that makes ...


-1

In the circumstances described it seems likely the deletion of the files will be (1) a breach of contract with possibly serious damages (depending on consequences of deletion) and (2) a criminal offence under s3 Unauthorised acts with intent to impair Computer Misuse Act 1990. One example case is R v Steffan Needham, reported by The Register): The "...


2

It is still "breaking the law". Any unauthorized copying is a violation of copyright law. It is presumably also a breach of contract. The copyright restriction is not limited to "and then using or sharing". Nor are sanctions resulting from breach of contract limited by the fact that you did not "use or share". The "did not use or share" consideration would ...


Top 50 recent answers are included