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2

Under GDPR article 4 Personal information is: any information relating to an identified or identifiable natural person (‘data subject’); an identifiable natural person is one who can be identified, directly or indirectly ... If the subject's name IP address, and other identifying information has been deleted, and there is no way to connect or re-connect ...


3

The GDPR has a fairly broad concept of personal data: any information that relates to an identifiable person. This is far more than directly identifiable information! The concept of identifiability is further explained in Recital 26: To determine whether a natural person is identifiable, account should be taken of all the means reasonably likely to be used, ...


4

For as long as they might be required: Company law requires 3 or 6 years for private and public companies respectively. Tax law allows audits for up to 6 years. Civil claims (e.g. for wage underpayment) can be brought for up to 6 years. Workers compensation is practically indefinitely. There is a limit of 3 years, but that runs from the discovery of the ...


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The retention periods depend on the exact legal basis for keeping such records. For example, accounting records might reasonably involve at least your bank account number, sort code, full name, and address. Under Section 388 of the Companies Act 2006, accounting records must be kept for three to six years, depending on the type of company (private or public)....


3

"Sealing" means ending access to the records of a proceeding, usually, in a judicial or quasi-judicial proceeding. This generally means that the records can't be released without a court order. The most common circumstance in which records are sealed is under state statutes which are designed to have the practical effect of eliminating the ...


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