New answers tagged

-1

No need to bother. Just declare the work to be in the public domain. Doing so entirely destroys the ability of another person to claim copy rights on it. But public domain doesn't protect you much. So it's in the public domain. And someone else grabs big chunks of your work, adapts, remixes, and publishes it, and copyrights it, the audacity! They can ...


2

No. The dead are generally not considered legal persons. They have no rights, and cannot own property, make contracts, sue, and so on. Giving them copyright would make as much sense (legally) as giving your rights to Niagara Falls. (Even if you could give copyright to a dead poet, it wouldn't help. As gnasher points out, copyright usually runs for 70 years ...


4

It doesn't work, just like transferring the copyright to a young person to make it last longer doesn't work. In places where the length of copyright depends on the death of someone, it always depends on the death of the author. You can transfer copyright, but you can't change who is the author. If I write a book, and some copyright law says the copyright ...


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