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united-states Copyright 17 USC 101 says: “Publication” is the distribution of copies or phonorecords of a work to the public by sale or other transfer of ownership, or by rental, lease, or lending. The offering to distribute copies or phonorecords to a group of persons for purposes of further distribution, public performance, or public display, constitutes ...


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Defamation To be defamatory, the material has to be published (communicated by any means – written, orally, pictorially) to at least one person other than the plaintiff. The person(s) who makes this communication is the publisher and is liable for the tort. Note that there can be multiple publishers of a single defamatory statement. For example, for a ...


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There is no magic about the word "allegedly". "Rob allegedly killed Alice" simply means "Someone said that Rob killed Alice". It implies that the person reporting this is not claiming that it is true or false, but just reporting what someone else has said. If in fact some person did say that, such a statement is true, and quite ...


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If someone has actually alleged that Rob killed Alice, then the statement is true and therefore it cannot be defamatory. But if nobody has in fact accused Rob of killing Alice, then the statement is false. It also damages Rob's reputation, so it is defamatory. If the speaker wants to express an opinion about whether Rob killed Alice, "allegedly" ...


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is Ryuho Okawa exposing themself to legal repercussions from anyone? Would it change if Iris Chang were alive? For the most part, that is very unlikely. The assertion about "summoning the spirit of Iris Chang from the spirit world" readily puts the audience on notice that the narrative altogether is unverifiable. In this regard, an example from US ...


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In some jurisdictions a dead person's heir can sue for defamation of that person, particularly in a number of European countries. In most common-law jurisdictions, no such suit is allowed. I do not know about the law of Japan on this issue. Such a suit would seem the only way to legally challenge such a book. Even if the law of Japan allows it, such a suit ...


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Not in California: "Defamation of a deceased person does not give rise to a civil right of action at common law in favor of the surviving spouse, family, or relatives, who are not themselves defamed. A libel on the memory of a deceased person is not deemed to inflict on the surviving relatives of the deceased any such legal damage as will sustain a ...


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Many countries of Continental law recognize “desecration”, “deningration” or defamation of the deceased or similar civil or criminal wrongs, the special form of defamation of the deceased and it is ordinary that those who had been relatives to the subject are entitled to press charges. (e.g. Germany (See: §189 “denigration of a deceased person”), Slovakia (...


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You can't defame dead people Legally, dead people can feel no shame or embarrassment which is at the heart of defamation.


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How much detail does one include in a complaint? See the procedural law your jurisdiction and how courts apply it. You only mention that you suing in the US, but not the state or even whether your complaint is to be filed in federal or state court. The applicable "court rules" or "rules of civil procedure" of your jurisdiction provide ...


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If one is suing for libel, would they just list “libel” in the “claims for relief” section in a complaint, or would the specify the type of libel? It is unclear what you mean by "claims for relief", but this might be one example of why using sample formats from so-called "self-help centers" is discouraged. Complaints typically use the ...


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If Person C falsely claims that Person A robbed Person B, that would be a defamatory statement. It is hard to see how person A could sue person C over this statement without at some point including in the evidence just what statement (or statements) Person A claims were defamatory, and evidence that those statements were in fact false. Even if person B's ...


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Short Answer The name of a lawsuit is the name of all of the Plaintiffs in the lawsuit v. the name of all of the Defendants in the lawsuit. This name appears in the "caption" of every document filed in court in the lawsuit (except evidentiary exhibits). The names of non-parties to a lawsuit does not appear in the name of the lawsuit or in the ...


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