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As user6726 notes in an answer, the page you link to derives from 26 USC 7701. However, it does not reproduce the text accurately. There, "United States person" is defined at section 7701(a)(30), and it notably lacks anything corresponding to "any other person that is not a foreign person." It's possible that that language is motivated by some court ...


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The legal definition you are probably looking for is machinegun rather than automatic weapon. It can be found in 26 U.S. Code § 5845, which in relevant part says: The term “machinegun” means any weapon which shoots, is designed to shoot, or can be readily restored to shoot, automatically more than one shot, without manual reloading, by a single function ...


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The helpful information provided by the IRS is an attempt to translate the definitions under the law, so if you think you are in some third category that isn't classified as either, you consult 26 USC 7701. For example, The term “person” shall be construed to mean and include an individual, a trust, estate,partnership, association, company or ...


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I asked this exact question to my criminal law lecturer. Rape indeed does require penetration of the mouth, anus, or vagina, with a penis. This is indeed a double standard, as this doesn't recognise many forms of female on male sexual assault as rape. (Though aggravated sexual assault may be a suitable charge in those circumstances, many people argue that ...


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So Defimation and Moral Injury are similar crimes, in that they are crimes where the victim is injured due to the statements of another person. The difference between the two is whether the statement is true. Defamatory statements are fictional statements that cause damage, though there is a special class of Defamatory Statements called Per se Defamation. ...


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The crime specifically entitled "rape" under the Sexual Offences Act 2003 is defines as the case where a person A (a) he intentionally penetrates the vagina, anus or mouth of another person (B) with his penis, (b) B does not consent to the penetration, and (c) A does not reasonably believe that B consents. There is a separate crime called "...


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