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Every state except New York, Illinois, and Washington has adopted the Uniform Electronic Transactions Act, and those three states have adopted their own electronic signature laws. At the federal level, a law known as ESIGN provides that electronic signatures are valid, and preempts state laws unless the state has adopted UETA or has its own electronic ...


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Contract validity does not depend on a signature at all, regardless of its type. Signatures are just a good way of showing that a given party agrees to the terms of a contract recorded by a given document, that shortcut the need for an independent third party to verify any and all contracts. An agreement can be implied or explicit that the parties consider ...


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Written Contract If there was a written contract, the fact that it wasn't signed is not relevant. While a signature is evidence of agreement with the terms there are other ways that acceptance can be indicated: like you paying them $600. Wrong Information Where the error is fundamental to the performance - e.g. you needed shipment to Alaska and they were ...


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Typical examples are contracts you "accept" online, like TOS's and privacy policies. Nobody reads that... Websites know that nobody reads their huge TOS's or privacy policies, and it has also been demonstrated (researches, polls, articles)... To target this specific portion of your question, this was addressed in Zappos.com Inc., Customer Data Security ...


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This applies to contract law in US and many (if not all) of EU jurisdictions. Is a contract valid if one of the party doesn't even read it? Yes. A meeting of the minds is presumed as long as the contract has been signed. The party's deliberate choice not to read the clauses does not release him or her from the obligations acquired at the moment the ...


3

I assume that you arranged a contract with some company which paid the contractor the full amount, and not you have to pay that company. If you stop paying the finance company, they will initiate legal proceedings against you to make good on your obligation, and that won't affect what the contractor does. It might not hurt you to write a formal letter (no ...


3

No. An engagement letter is a written confirmation that you have hired a lawyer which also sets forth the contractual obligations of the parties (i.e. the basis upon which attorneys' fees will be charged in the case). Instead of serving as an "estimate" or "approximate quote" of the fees to be charged, it is evidence that there is an attorney-client ...


3

No LLC or corporate entity exists around or in relation to SoftDAO. That's a bad thing, not a good thing, to those involved. Mr. Founder is obviously liable. When he wrote the DAO, he intended that it compete with IncumbentCo, and thus almost certainly intended that the software would violate the patent. And it doesn't matter that he's not the majority ...


3

The general answer is, no, it is not valid in the US, see this article. Exceptions to laws recognizing e-signatures abound which exclude wills from general laws recognizing electronic signatures. Nevada is the one current exception (conveniently located between Oregon and Arizona). There have been attempts to legalize electronic wills, including in Arizona (...


3

I know that I have to provide detailed information which data I save and how I use it. Yes, you should, if you are getting access to users' Dropbox accounts, which will contain all sorts of private data, copyrighted (and illegally copied copyrighted files), etc. You provide the detailed information to your users through a click-through Privacy Policy - ...


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Short Answer: There Is No International Legal Standard The question of whether a scanned copy of a document is acceptable evidence in a court proceeding or bureaucratic procedure depends upon the rules and laws of each particular country and private organization that requires you to produce records. There is no international regulation that applies across ...


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At least currently, the presumption is that terms of a contract are understood by both parties, and there is no limit on the length or complexity of a contract. There is a risk that the writer of the contract could express a term ambiguously, in which case the ambiguity would be construed against their interest. Assuming that is not the case, then the law ...


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Unless the words are defined by the terms and conditions or a directly applicable law, a jurisdiction is likely to ascribe them their meaning as determined by common usage. They are all context-specific actions which should have the same outcome: turning a user action implying assent to some statement, into a electronic record of that action. A reasonable ...


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The CAN-SPAM act, enforced by the FTC, does not require prior permission to send email, but you cannot send a deceptive commercial message. If a message pretends to not be an advertisement (but is), it is deceptive – advertisements have to be clearly identified as advertisements. A customer can give prior affirmative consent for a sender to send an ...


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[Just seen the edit - EU laws are likely to be similar to UK, and there is likely to be the equivalent of a Citizens Advice Bureau.] You might be covered by local laws - depending on your jurisdiction. But three weeks is a long time to change your mind. The UK, for example, gives two weeks for purchases you've not seen in person. Generally, though, you're ...


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We can't say much for sure without being able to see your contract (or contracts). Don't do anything now that may cause trouble later. Continue making payments. You are almost certainly going to want to talk with a lawyer, and the New Jersey bar association has a site to find lawyers. An initial consultation is unlikely to be too expensive, and in a ...


1

One option is to just trust and hope that they won't reveal something that you don't want revealed. At the other end of the spectrum, you could hire lawyers and negotiate a binding NDA, as part of the sales contract, and what you'd be getting is a reasonable professional opinion that the NDA does indeed have the desired effect. Or you could try to patent the ...


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I don't have to look at the terms and conditions because what you are describing is the crime of fraud - using deceit for financial gain.


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Digital signatures are sometimes allowed in the U.S., but, when they are allowed, they are allowed only in the context of a fairly specific statutory procedure for doing so. Part of the idea of a manual signature is that a human being manually writing something creates an original document that can be pulled out if necessary and has some rather distinctive ...


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The "as-simple-as-possible document" is easily created by writing down exactly what you intend to do. If you are going to give all the money to charity, say that. If you are going to use the money to pay expenses like printing and distribution costs and give what's left over to charity, say that. Then do what you say and keep records to prove you did it. ...


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When you fill out the document and submit it, you are demonstrating your assent to the terms. By arguing that you didn't click the button, you touched it, you are are arguing that you did not assent to the terms. It's going to be pretty hard to show that you did not assent to the terms after you went through the trouble of filling out the thing. You probably ...


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