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28

The takedown action is a little sketchy. The law regarding takedown notices and host liability is here. The notice includes "Identification of the copyrighted work claimed to have been infringed", a "signature of a person authorized to act on behalf of the owner of an exclusive right that is allegedly infringed", and a statement that &...


10

The takedown request states: A list of youtube-dl forks to take down (uninteresting) The clear purpose of this source code is to (i) circumvent the technological protection measures used by authorized streaming services such as YouTube, and (ii) reproduce and distribute music videos and sound recordings owned by our member companies without authorization ...


7

Under the DMCA(United States Federal Law: Digital Millennium Copyright Act) and its Safe Harbor provisions, yes, Youtube is protected from copyright claims, provided they comply when they receive a notice. But....the DMCA that gives Youtube (and its parent company Google/Alphabet) this shield is US law, but Youtube does large amounts of business in other ...


6

It's not clear to me that your website is, per se, illegal. (Though good luck finding a webhost with a hard drive large enough to store it. Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone is roughly 38,000 characters. If I've done my calculations correctly, storing all of the strings of this length or shorter would require something like 1053760 GB of storage. ...


4

No Company A is liable for its own acts and omissions and no one else’s.


3

If a legal action is filed, the take down order generally remains in force until a court orders otherwise. If a legal action is not filed with the required time frame, the Internet Service Provider (ISP) such as Google is no longer required to honor the take down order. See generally here and here. Also, an ISP is not required to honor even a valid takedown ...


3

It was noted in a comment that one possible implementation of such a website would be to dynamically generate the text from the ID: The website doesn't have to store anything, it can just generate the text on the fly provided the ID. A person with 1 computer programming class under their belt could make that and paste the program in this very comment. Your ...


2

To prove infringement the rightsholder needs to show you actually copied their work, and did not create it independently. Normally the way this is done is by showing that you had access to the original, or that the end result is substantially similar. So it is theoretically possible this would not be infringement, because your creation did not involve ...


1

wouldn't this count as an unlawful clause in the license agreement, therefore, invalidating the entire contract? No. The excerpt of legislation you posted implies that the clause in the EULA is null and void --rather than illegal-- if your reason for reverse engineering meets the legislative criteria. For the clause to be illegal, the statute would have to ...


1

No However, if you do reverse engineer the software you cannot use the licence for any other purpose. By doing so you have “stepped out” of the licence and can only copy the software as permitted by copyright law. Therefore, if you do reverse engineer it you may lose the ability to do other things you want to do.


1

Short version: No, no one has even been prosecuted. Does the perjury clause apply to all the information in the notification, or only the statement that the complaining party is authorised to act etc. ? This seems to be answerable by the plain text of the statute that you quoted: A statement that the information in the notification is accurate, and under ...


1

I know this is the law stack, but to backfill OP's understanding of the issue at large: Youtube also has business reasons. Having worked in content management in a very similar web platform, I can tell you two of them right off the bat. They don't want their platform flooded with crud. They want Youtube to be about original content like Blancolirio or ...


1

You don't give a jurisdiction, but from the DMCA tag I'm assuming you are interested in the USA. There is no hard rule about what counts as "fair use". The law lists 4 factors for courts to take into account: The purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational purposes; the ...


1

Your software is protected by copyright: decompiling, fiddling with, and redistributing your software is infringement. If they published their product e.g. with Google, then you can file a DMCA takedown notice, with the host service. At that point, Google will take the item down; the other party may or may not file a counter-notice (claiming that they have ...


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