29

The U.S. Constitution merely requires that you be a U.S. citizen, that you be at least 30 years of age, that you have resided nine years in the United States, and that you currently reside in the state from which you are elected, to be a U.S. Senator. The courts have held that extra-constitutional qualifications for the office may not be imposed. The ...


10

The law is not settled and will shortly be before the High Court (sitting as the Court of Disputed Returns) but theoretically: yes! The provision on Disqualification is s44, specifically subsection (i): Any person who: (i) is under any acknowledgment of allegiance, obedience, or adherence to a foreign power, or is a subject or a citizen or entitled to the ...


7

There are two approaches to determining citizenship: where you are born (jus soli – this holds in the US), and who you were born to (jus sanguinis – the case in India). There are mixes of these systems, such as where a person born to an American but not in the US is still an American citizen (e.g. Ted Cruz). Canada allows Canadian citizenship to be inherited ...


7

You are a British citizen: Born in the UK between 1 January 1983 and 1 October 2000 Whether you’re a British citizen depends on where your parents were from and their circumstances. There are different rules if, when you were born: at least one of your parents was a British or Irish citizen at least one of your parents was a citizen of an EU or EEA country ...


7

The US Constitution states the qualifications for being a Senator (Article I, section 3, clause 3) No Person shall be a Senator who shall not have attained to the Age of thirty Years, and been nine Years a Citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an Inhabitant of that State for which he shall be chosen Congress is not empowered to ...


5

The Czech Consulate General in New York has a page about this. Presumably a similar situation would prevail at other Czech consulates, so this answer should help even if you do not reside in its territory. The page notes that if you are not "a relative" you can "enclose an explanation letter why do you need the duplicate of the birth [or ...


5

The only people the law does not apply to are " persons licensed by the US Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control." http://www.visitcuba.com/travel-guide/travel-tips/special-note-to-usa-travellers/ If you have close family there the license is not needed. If you qualify to travel on a general license for family travel, you do not ...


5

You got an entry stamp, not a visa stamp. A US visa (aka "visa stamp") is a physical sticker that you have to go to a US consulate to apply for, which takes up one page of your passport and says "US Visa" on it. Canadian citizens do not need or get US visas to travel to the US for most types of nonimmigrant statuses, including as a visitor. US citizens are ...


5

I strongly suspect that the answer is that no, this would not work. The validity of the additional grant of citizenship would be evaluated by an Australian court applying Australian law. One of the underlying principles of that body of law is that gifts must be accepted and can be disclaimed. Another is that an adult's legal status cannot normally be ...


4

You are already a British citizen. This will not impact your German nationality (I don't know anything about Spanish Nationality Law): (1) Prior to 2000, EC nationals were considered 'settled' when exercising Treaty rights in the UK. They did not have to apply for indefinite leave to remain to be considered settled. As you were born in the UK to at least ...


4

We do not have a law requiring you to renounce citizenships that you might hold, like the Nationality Law. I am not sure what you mean saying that renouncement is processed only within the Japanese legal system -- that is how it is everywhere, and there is no international authority or clearing house that handles citizenship renunciations. The effect of ...


4

He has to follow the law of the country he is in and those of which he is a citizen. A citizen is subject to their country's jurisdiction wherever they are, however, some laws are only enforced within a nation's boundaries and some have extra-territorial application. 18 U.S. Code § 2423 - Transportation of minors covers the US law (I don't speak Hungarian or ...


4

Not normally The loss of citizenship is dealt with in Part 2 Division 3 of the Citizenship Act 2007. s32A contains a summary of the 5 ways it can happen: There are 5 ways in which you can cease to be an Australian citizen: you may renounce your Australian citizenship: see section 33; or if you did not automatically become an Australian citizen, the ...


4

This FAQ from the US embassy in Korea explains all of the concerns that a Korean-American might have. If you have a Korean lational parent, you are automatically Korean. Before March 31 of the year you turn 18, you must renounce your Korean citizenship, lest you be then subject to the military service law. If you were a Korean citizen and then gained another ...


3

Indeed, it is not possible to be European "twice or more," but that doesn't prevent the possession of multiple EU nationalities. A person who possesses the nationality of an EU country is a citizen of the European Union, and a person who possesses the nationality of more than one EU country is also a citizen of the European Union. This follows from Article ...


3

Yes, depending on the local registration laws of the country in question, when you have a residence in that country. You can also be a resident of multiple countries under the same conditions. You can also be considered a non- resident citizen of your own country. In the European Union, Residence Laws are national laws only for periods up to 3 months ...


3

American citizens can have dual citizenship , but if an american citizen who has his/her citizenship renounced (even though the person was originally an american citizen) , then what is a way of obtaining the citizenship back? Possibly, by the same means that a non-citizen could be naturalized. But, immigration and nationality officials have broad ...


3

If the Attorney General has officially determined that you renounced US citizenship for the purpose of avoiding taxation, you have a lifetime ban under INA 212(a)(10)(E), and there is no immigrant waiver for this ban. See 9 FAM 302.12-6. I am not sure if the Attorney General has ever made such a determination about anyone. Otherwise, I don't see anything ...


3

The law was changed several times, and different versions apply to different age groups because certain rules were not changed retroactively. The page you link describes the situation for children born after the year 2000. My advice: citizenship is such a serious matter that you should consult a specialized lawyer, not a random crowd on the web.


3

Your caveat about not being a national of either country is a bit puzzling, because your question is about acquiring the countries' nationality, which implies as a matter of course that you do not presently have either nationality. After acquiring each country's nationality, of course, you will be a national of that country, so by the time you are a dual ...


3

From an opinion piece published by the public broadcaster Australian Broadcasting Corporation What the High Court citizenship decision says about the health of our democracy The standard is a strict one: It is no excuse, for the purposes of section 44, that an MP has no real ties to a foreign power, or did not in fact know they were a citizen of ...


3

The case that you mentioned isn't an example of what you're talking about. One thing that immediately comes to mind is the Shamima Begum case. She fled her London home to join the Islamic state but now she wants to come back to the UK (after realizing), but UK's Home Office revoked her citizenship, claiming that she could claim Bangladesh citizenship by ...


3

If he is indeed a Lebanese citizen he cannot be deported from Lebanon. The essence of citizenship is that it is a place from which you cannot be deported. He might be punished for violating Lebanese law regarding identity documents, but the remedy of deportation or expulsion would not be available.


3

Art. 5 says Any person born abroad whose parents are both Chinese nationals or one of whose parents is a Chinese national shall have Chinese nationality. But a person whose parents are both Chinese nationals and have both settled abroad, or one of whose parents is a Chinese national and has settled abroad, and who has acquired foreign nationality at birth ...


3

It is well known and often repeated that China does not tolerate dual citizenship, except in the case of its citizens who have right of abode in Hong Kong or Macau. The Chinese Nationality Law is clear about this: Article 3. This is not true and you misunderstand what Article 3 says. Article 3 says (depending on your translation): The People's Republic of ...


2

Under both the current constitution (article 32) and the previous 1961 constitution (article 35) "Any person who was born in a foreign territory, and is the child of a father and mother who are both Venezuelans by birth". However, in the 1961 version the constitution declares (art. 39) that Venezuelan nationality is lost by option or ...


2

Presumably you are asking a legal question and not hoping to generate opinionated discussion. In which case, it matters what country we are talking about. In the US, there is a legal concept "lawful permanent resident" which you can apply for (if you are legally here, reside here for 5 years, and are of good moral character). This comes with a number of ...


2

Probably No. To the extent that the airline is enforcing immigrations laws, it is likely doing so at the direction of a government official or government regulations, or sometimes as an actual agent of the government. Essentially, in the first instance, the airline would have an illegality defense to a claim for breach of contract. An airline can't be ...


2

The question is not if the airline is wrong, the question is if they are negligent If the airline has a reasonable belief that the trip is unlawful then they are within their legal obligations to stop Bob boarding. In arriving at their belief, providing they acted within the law and their own policies and made reasonable enquires within the time constraints, ...


2

US law (8 USC 1451) allows the revocation of naturalization, and does not restrict such revocation to people having any particular actual or potential citizenship. The US is also not a party to the statelesness conventions. So it is possible to legally make a person stateless. The nationality law of Syria is kind of complex, being of the paternal jus ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible