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21

Could the GoDaddy employee self-phishing test constitute a breach of contract? No. There is no contract. It was only the announcement of a gift. That gift might have been unexpected, especially if no similar bonus was given in previous years. The employee's act of filling in his information does not seemingly amount to "consideration". Filling the ...


8

In most jurisdictions a message sent by email is now legally the same as one sent on paper by, say, postal mail, and a name typed at the end, or other indication of source is the legal equivalent of a physical signature. You are probably in the same legal position yu would have been in if you had written, signed, and sent by post a letter of acceptance.


6

That GDPR Disclaimer is no protection in some jurisdictions: the applicable laws to that situation in germany for example don't care about the GDPR: Cold calling, mailing, or e-mailing private people to advertise services all is handled by the same law: Without the consent it is expressly illegal under §7 of the law against unfair competition (Gesetz gegen ...


5

Canada's anti-spam legislation (CASL)1 at the time was more strict than the regulations in other countries (e.g. CAN-SPAM Act in the U.S.). Notably, it applied to all emails sent to people in Canada, including those sent from other countries (of course, likelihood of enforcement is another issue). In general, a commercial electronic message can only be sent ...


5

It is not a crime or a tort to accidentally sign in to an email provider with an incorrect email address, even if that address is actually held by some other person. Not attempting to enter a password or repeat the attempt makes it clear there was no intent to obtain unauthorized access, and the emails make that even more clear.


5

Could I get into legal trouble for this? No. Relax. Your three emails are very unlikely to cause a data privacy professor to feel harassed. Just move on regardless of whether he replies at all. Don't keep sending another email just because the recipient has not replied to your previous one. As for the issue that prompted you to start emailing the professor, ...


4

In the United States, at least, this is a pretty easy question. There are of course plenty of reasons not to enjoy the e-mail. Perhaps the reader gets too much spam. Perhaps the reader is a fascist. But no one who accepts the American conception of free speech should have any trouble intuiting whether sending this e-mail was legal. Communications in support ...


4

Acceptance of an offer forms a binding contract under German law You can accept a contract orally, by action or, as you did, in writing.


4

Written promise pre-purchase vs signed agreement, what's stronger? The signed agreement is decisive because it "states that it supersedes any previous agreements". The language portrays that the customer no longer considers the refund option a requirement for moving forward with the transaction. Signing that contract without the right to a refund ...


4

united-states If there is more than 1 email account annoying you online, do you need to obtain separate court orders to identify each one, or is one order sufficient? A judge could order an email provider to unmask multiple accounts with one court order. Judges are not really restricted in the number of things they can do per order, as long as it's within ...


3

All oif those except perhaps the feedback seem to be "transactional" content to which the CAN SPAM requirements do not apply. The feedback request looks to me as if it first the 'other" class in the linked FAQ, and so also would not trigger the requirements.


2

The GDPR protects public personal data pretty much the same as non-public data, meaning: you can process the data only if you have a clear purpose and legal basis. It is the purpose that determines which GDPR Art 6 legal basis you can rely on, such as consent (opt-in) or legitimate interest (opt-out). Summary: you may or may not be able to contact them, ...


2

No You are free to make criticisms of your former employer. They are free to take offence and take actions in response - including blackballing your current employer.its their choice who they do business with and why. We maintain a client list with a status code - Green, Yellow, Orange, Red. What rating you get and maintain is based on a highly subjective ...


2

Under the condition that a rental contract is unrestricted in time, it can be done orally. The conditions set out in the BGB (civil code) are then binding. Otherwise it must be in writing, unless both parties agree to an eMail form and the contract does not state explicitly that it must be in writing. Once signed (for eMail: after it has been sent and ...


2

Trish's answer is by and large correct for the German law for the German market. But it does not address the real question: In which cases is German competition law and the GDPR applicable? § 7 II Nr. 3 UWG In the German legal system the prohibitions of the competition law (UWG, Gesetz gegen den unlauteren Wettbewerb) is a type of tort/non-contractual ...


1

Is there any repository (online database) that would tell me is a given email address is owned by person who is in a country that is controlled by GDPR? It seems to me that there should be. I don't think there is one either and I suspect such a repository could, in itself, be somewhat questionable under the GDPR. The safest way not to violate the GDPR is to ...


1

Is it legal to read publicly in an open public meeting? Yes. Generally speaking, a lawyer's communications to third parties or his client's prospective adversary(-ies) are not protected from disclosure. From a legal standpoint, the lawyer's email to the school board is equivalent to the scenario of the superintendent himself being the sender.


1

An email is protected by copyright, and cannot be lawfully distributes without permission., However, it could be quoted from fairly freely under fair use (in the US) or fair dealing (in many other countries). Particularly since most emails have no commercial market, so their value cannot be impaired, a fair use defesne is likely to prevail in many cases. ...


1

When you collect or process personal data, you must provide information to data subjects. The required information is listed in Art 13 GDPR, though most privacy notice also include the items from Art 14 GDPR (if there are third party data sources) and Art 15 GDPR (which simplifies responses to data subject access requests). The ICO has provided detailed ...


1

No It lacks one of the fundamental requirements of a contract: there is no intention on the part of GoDaddy to form a legal contract. Without that, GoDaddy is not making an offer that is subject to acceptance. Now, if they had made this offer to the general public, then they may have fallen foul of other laws and been forced to honour their commitment but in ...


1

Sometimes, Emails sent to the wrong person can be really expensive for the one sending! Let's assume it was a doctor and he sends Bob's results to Alice. He did violate HIPAA, which can be REALLY expensive, and Alice can report that to the local health authorities. Let's assume it was a doctor and he sends Bob's confidential conversation to Alice... and he ...


1

It appears from your description that you have in mind abandoning your email account (possibly closing it) and opening a new account. You have no obligation to continue using an email account that causes problems for you. Simply abandoning the account is not the wisest choice, since there is some chance that someone may gain access to the account and they do ...


1

are there any laws or regulations that might disallow this sort of 'unofficial' economic bullying? What you describe so far is not actionable. You have not suffered damages; your MD's statements are inconclusive on whether your continued employment is at risk if you continue your [valid] criticism; and the former employer simply is expressing how he intends ...


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