45

There is a state law that requires you to obey the police: ORC 2917.13, which says you may not Fail to obey the lawful order of any law enforcement officer engaged in the law enforcement officer's duties at the scene of or in connection with a fire, accident, disaster, riot, or emergency of any kind. If you do, misconduct at an emergency is a ...


15

I'm speculating a bit, but it is sometimes hard to distinguish a 'request' from an 'order' when dealing with law enforcement. Police might say "Can you open this door for us please?". But this can mean either "we would like you to open this door for us if you don't mind" or "we are ordering you to open this door, but in a polite way". I wold perhaps ...


4

Unless there is some surprise in the wording of your contract, you have no realistic legal recourse. You had a hope that the warranty could provide something which it does not provide. A "reasonable person" would read the wording of the contract and understand that it requires pre-approval, and does not include an exception clause "unless it gets really cold"...


4

Authority A lot of this falls under life skills and common sense, rather than law per se. If you've lived and worked in skyscrapers and laboratories and corporate environments these are things you just come to know. Maybe some of this comes from being a Boy Scout growing up as well. Calling 911 Usually there would be a law prohibiting employment ...


4

Presidential power of that type might arise from congressional authorization, where Congress authorizes action when POTUS deems that such-and-such is the case. An example is 8 USC 1182(f), which says Whenever the President finds that the entry of any aliens or of any class of aliens into the United States would be detrimental to the interests of the ...


3

The question conflates two issues that only sometimes overlap - emergency powers on one hand, and the authority of the President v. Congress on issues of foreign affairs and national security on the other. Some of the big cases involving the emergency powers of the President are entirely domestic: FDR's bank holidays, a case involving the President ...


3

Wife was an RA at a women's college. I'm seeing this from two perspectives... 1) the police / fire are just human beings like you and me. They're not infallable. There may be a single set of keys, and the person responding might not have them. But, if the officer or fire personel are responding to an emergency, then they do need access. Facilitating their ...


3

It is a felony to escape from a jail; see California Penal Code section 4532. (Escapes from a prison are covered in section 4530). However, California law recognizes a necessity defense when a crime is committed in order to avoid "significant bodily harm". (See the link for other important elements of the defense.) This defense would probably only be ...


3

In other words, what thoughts regarding freedoms and rights from the founders of a nation support a leader taking supreme power over its Congress? Generally speaking, one doesn't take "supreme power over Congress", one instead, disregards laws duly enacted by Congress or express mandates of the Constitution, including those related to cooperation with ...


2

The question of whether it would be a crime to escape in that situation boils down to the "necessity" or "choice of evils" justification which applies only in extreme circumstances but might apply here. As others have noted, that defense would apply only so long as it is actually necessary to escape to stay alive, after which someone would have to ...


2

§38 StVO Wegerecht You are required to make way when practible i. e. within the rules of the StVO it is assumed that a driver does not have the needed overview to correctly access the situation If nothing else is possible, infringements are tolerated. A driver should note date, time and (where practical) ambulance number, so that if a fine is sent (red ...


2

Yes, you can ask but if they don’t they can come in anyway. The law gives them the right to enter in certain circumstances. Notwithstanding, any government employee that disclosed confidential information that they got in the course of their employment could be sued and possibly prosecuted.


1

I would check your local and state laws regarding rendering aid (often referred to as Good Samaritan Laws). Usually, when acting in good faith in the assistance of a person who is reasonably believed to be ind distress, you cannot be punished for damages in the course of rendering aid (Often called Life over Limb policy, the hypothetical situation is that ...


1

Considering that there would be good reasons for such a policy, it's unlikely that there's a specific law agaisnt it. An in-house security/fire department is the appropriate organization to coordinate with external responders. It wouldn't be useful if the public Fire department arrives at a closed gate, for instance. The police department might find the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible