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2

Per T8CCR 3395(c): The water shall be located as close as practicable to the areas where employees are working. Where drinking water is not plumbed or otherwise continuously supplied, it shall be provided in sufficient quantity at the beginning of the work shift to provide one quart per employee per hour for drinking for the entire shift. The is (in my ...


-6

No. In or outside Europe, you can't refuse to use Gsuite / Office365 or any other tool your employer reasonably requires. You might think refusing to use the given cheap-crap, flat-pack desk when you prefer a custom-built mahogany work of art "reasonable" and how much credence d'you think a court would give that, even if you yourself paid for the ...


33

You probably can't refuse to use such services. The relationship between you and these services is very different when you interact with them as a consumer, versus when these services are provided on behalf of your employer. In the latter case, the service is (or at least should be) bound as a data processor who can only* use your personal data as instructed ...


21

Your employer should have a Data Protection Officer. The first step when you have data privacy concerns at the workplace should be to talk to the DPO. An institution using software as a service by Microsoft, Google etc. will usually have a contract with the provider. This contract differs from the contract you have e.g. with Stackexchange, where you sign ...


0

The two portals you mention will not help. The first is for consumers, but you are a business person not a consumer. The second seems to be for people complaining about government services, but your client is not a government service. As Joginder has said, the only recourse you have is through the courts. That's not a good place to be, but there it is.


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