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3

Is there any law in the U.S. requiring the employer to disclose and show the actual physical work place? No. There is not. Your remedy is to either request an ADA accommodation, if that is viable, or to quit. If you can show that your decision to quit was a "constructive discharge" because you couldn't work in the conditions provided, you could ...


4

In the US, persons with a disability are entitled to a reasonable accommodation for their disability. There is no requirement to tell an employee everything about their working conditions before a hire, in fact it would be illegal for the employer to ask "Do you have a disability that would prevent you from working underground?". Once hired, you ...


0

I'm not familiar with the law of the Netherlands, but in the United States, we have the "after-acquired evidence" doctrine, which basically allows an employer to rely on information it learned after terminating an employee to limit its damages in a wrongful-termination suit. For a more simple example, imagine that Company X fires Employee A because ...


1

No If George is suing for unfair dismissal then the court case turns on if the reason(s) the employer used to terminate him was unfair. It is irrelevant if there were legitimate reasons that did not inform the employer’s decision. Evidence of these should be excluded on that basis. Whether George finds it unfair is also irrelevant - most people do find being ...


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Could it make sense to add a non-used reason for firing someone in court? Yes, it could. That is because evidence that unexpectedly comes to surface during court proceedings could reinforce the employer's legal position insofar as the worker incurred breach of contract. The fact that the virus the worker programmed and spread did not have a "real[ly] ...


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