13

are employers legally allowed to punish (e.g. fire, reprimand, etc.) an employee who shares wage/salary information with their colleagues? No. Section 8 of the BC Labour Relations Code preserves for the employee "the freedom to communicate to an employee a statement of fact [...] with respect to the employer's business". More conclusively, section ...


12

australia Wage information is confidential: but only on the employer In Australia, an employer must keep the remuneration of their employees confidential (subject to legal disclosure requirements). However, employees can take out full-page ads in the newspaper about them if they want. Whether such information is disclosed or discussed within a workplace or ...


10

It depends on whether Alice is a "minister." This case plays on the tension between employment-discrimination laws that prohibit discrimination on the basis of religion, and the First Amendment, “which protects a religious group's right to shape its own faith and mission through its appointments.” Hosanna-Tabor Evangelical Lutheran Church & Sch....


5

Yes - there is no age upper limit written in the law. However it does include this exception at 29 U.S. Code § 623(f)(1): allowing an employer - (1) to take any action otherwise prohibited under subsections (a), (b), (c), or (e) of this section where age is a bona fide occupational qualification reasonably necessary to the normal operation of the par­ticu­...


5

The difficulty is that tips are, by statute, considered a form of wages rather than a form of self-employment income for the tipped employee for income tax purposes (in contrast, employers don't have to keep track of tips for minimum wage purposes, tipped employees just have an extremely low minimum wage+). (If it was self-employment income, withholding and ...


3

This practice is probably not illegal, but I think it is at best ethically dubious. The invoice specifies ""Advising in relation to employment agreement with X", but according to the question no advice about X was given or even asked for, and while advice about Y was discussed, no such advice was given. That suggests that the asker owes the ...


2

was there a good way to publicly shame Bob, and prevent him from getting his next job, without breaking Carol’s confidence? Apparently not. The conclusion that Bob's violations of company policy are short of breaking any laws leaves little to no reason for publicly shaming him. Details on the company policy, the facts, and the statements might make a ...


1

I suspect that id one give notice in a form of words similar to I resign effective {date} then {date} will be the legal date of resignation. But this will depend on how your employment contract, or your employer's policy, treats the resignation date. It may well depend on the law of your country, or sub-national unit (such as a state if in the US). As you ...


1

You didn't form a contract in the sense of a legal document stating your intentions and terms. Instead, you formed what the courts call an "implied in fact" contract, where your agreement to the terms is implied by your actions. You may not have believed you were agreeing to pay for anything, but contract law generally ignores evidence about what ...


1

In many countries, this would directly conflict with the legal requirement that equal work be equally payed. One of the very reasons why it was (or often still is) a fact that men earn more for the same job than women, is because salaries are kept secret. If it was illegal to share information about ones earnings, this could not be counteracted on. The ...


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