52 votes
Accepted

As an employer, can I compel my employees to vote?

Nobody so far has discussed Electoral law e.g. Representation of the People Act 1983 There are various clauses that may be relevant, one of which is: A voter shall be guilty of bribery if before ...
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49 votes

Is there a contract, or was this offer not accepted?

The contract was made the moment Mr. E asked for the cake, the baker agreed to make it, and (while or shortly before) the baker created a receipt ("ticket") at around 1 PM. The receipt is ...
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32 votes
Accepted

Can someone be charged with the murder of unidentified victims?

Yes, a person can be charged with the murder of person or persons unknown The reason that police are really keen to identify the victim include (in no particular order): It will probably clear up a ...
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  • 148k
31 votes

As an employer, can I compel my employees to vote?

Enforcement by firing a person could be a problem. There are specific allowed reasons to fairly fire an employee, which does not include "failure to vote". The description of unfair reasons includes, ...
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  • 157k
28 votes

Who owns the rights to the questions on Stack Exchange?

This seems to be a mix of question about law and a meta-question about this site, but I'll treat it as an on-topic question about law. The author of a question, or answer, owns the copyright to their ...
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  • 157k
28 votes
Accepted

Under what statute can an English judge 'sentence' someone to read classic literature?

Section 277 of the Sentencing Act 2020 provides: 277 Suspended sentence order for person aged 21 or over: availability (1) This section applies where, in dealing with an offender for an offence, a ...
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  • 4,311
28 votes
Accepted

Is it illegal to turn off someone’s loudspeakers in public?

Not "illegal", but rather a "civil wrong" instead as this sounds like a (minor) case of Trespass to Chattels, being: ...an intentional interference with another person's lawful ...
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25 votes

In the UK, can a landlord/agent add new tenants to a joint tenancy agreement without the consent of the current tenants?

No All parties must agree to change a contract. On the face of it, the New Tenant has to be “acceptable to both the Landlord and the remaining individual or individuals comprising the Tenant (the ...
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  • 148k
23 votes
Accepted

False written accusations not made public - is there law to cover this?

Defamation requires communication to a third-party I can say (or write) anything I want about a person directly to that person and, unless it is a threat, they have no recourse at all. I can call ...
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  • 148k
23 votes
Accepted

Land Registry Clause

I would assume that the seller ('Transferor') still owned numbers 7 and 11 at the time of the sale. If so, this clause means that the owners of 7 and 11 (now and in the future) have a right of way on ...
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23 votes
Accepted

Coronavirus - Exercise in a UK National Park

There is no clear answer, and I suspect an argument could be made either way. The relevant regulations in this case are The Health Protection (Coronavirus, Restrictions) (England) Regulations 2020. ...
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22 votes
Accepted

What happens if I sell the same physical item to several people?

What is the name of the crime and/or tort I have committed? You are guilty of the crime of fraud, the crime of theft of the money and the item (I can't point you to the precise statute). You have ...
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  • 130k
21 votes

Why is it unlawful for an officer of the court to inform a jury they may find as they see fit, absolutely?

The "why" is pretty simple: the duty of the court is the ensure compliance with the law and uphold the rule of law. A statement to the contrary would undermine that obligation and would ...
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  • 130k
20 votes
Accepted

Does grabbing someone by the jacket constitute assault?

Has Person B committed assault even though person A may have verbally offended person B? Yes An assault is any act (and not mere omission to act) by which a person intentionally or recklessly causes ...
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19 votes
Accepted

What is the nature and purpose of the UK highway code?

The Highway Code is a Ministerial Direction that brings together in one place for easy reference legislational requirements (by the the use of "must" and "must not") and general ...
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18 votes

Who owns the rights to the questions on Stack Exchange?

The Network Terms say: Subscriber Content You agree that any and all content, including without limitation any and all text, graphics, logos, tools, photographs, images, illustrations, software or ...
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  • 89.5k
16 votes

False written accusations not made public - is there law to cover this?

Dale M's answer pretty much covers it, but it sounds like this is a case of misunderstanding by the former employee rather than an actionable accusation. The way you have edited the documents will ...
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16 votes
Accepted

Carrying a knife in public in the UK

Short answer: It depends. It is lawful if one has a lawful reason, such as it's needed for work, or it's a folding pocketknife (e.g. a Swiss Army Knife) with a blade less than 3 inches. Long answer: ...
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16 votes

Clever Probate Fraud (UK) - How Did He Do It?

Who administers the will of someone who dies intestate, who has no family? There is a position known as the "public administrator" paid mostly from fees charged to probate estates in most ...
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  • 130k
16 votes

Could a contract with ludicrous terms be enforced?

Consideration has to be sufficient; it does not have to be adequate See What is a contract and what is required for them to be valid? Consideration need not be adequate; that is, the deal does not ...
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  • 148k
16 votes

Is it illegal to turn off someone’s loudspeakers in public?

Probably Not In most jurisdiction there is no specific law against touching another person's property without harming it. On the other hand, the person playing the recording may well not be committing ...
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16 votes
Accepted

What possible penalties can there be for failing to comply with rule 286 of the UK highway code?

Rule 286 states: If you are involved in a collision which causes damage or injury to any other person, vehicle, animal or property, you MUST stop. If possible, stop in a place of relative safety (...
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15 votes
Accepted

Is it illegal for a police officer to buy lottery tickets?

No. There's nothing in neither the Gambling Act 2005 nor the Police Regulations 2003 specifically preventing police officers from buying lottery tickets (or gambling in general for that matter). The ...
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  • 20.7k
15 votes

Could a contract with ludicrous terms be enforced?

There might be legitimate reasons why A made such a contract. For one thing, it might have been a way of making what amounted to a gift to B. A might wish to be rid of the expense of maintaining the ...
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  • 89.5k
15 votes

How many British statutes are in effect?

All(?) current UK legislation may be found here. It is searchable on just a word, eg: there are 61 UK Public General Acts containing the word "police". Or by type: there are 116 Ministerial ...
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  • 20.7k
15 votes
Accepted

Landlord carrying out full inspection after giving impression that she would only be there to follow up a pipe repair

It is usual for a lease to specify for what purposes and on what notice the landlord is entitled to access. Often there is a provision allowing the landlord access on no notice in an "emergency&...
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  • 89.5k
14 votes

Why do solicitor advice procedure regulations require collection of landlord details at client intake when solicitors advise on tenancy issues?

The purpose is to avoid the possibility that the solicitor will inadvertently end up providing advice to more than one side of the same dispute or transaction, putting the solicitor in a conflict of ...
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  • 130k
13 votes
Accepted

Why do solicitor advice procedure regulations require collection of landlord details at client intake when solicitors advise on tenancy issues?

This answer is an expansion on ohwilleke's answer, which explains that the reason probably involves avoiding conflicts of interest with other clients. The relevant provisions in england-and-wales are ...
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  • 4,311
13 votes

Can the "de minimis non curat lex" rule render actions that are otherwise illegal, legal?

The maxim "de minimis non curat lex" is not so much of a rule as a guideline. It essentially says that when a court considers a matter too trivial to bother with, it can simply dismiss the ...
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  • 89.5k
13 votes
Accepted

Is the German embassy in London bound by British accessibility law like the Equality Act 2010?

Laws of the host country do apply in foreign embassies, but the authorities of the host country may only enforce laws in a foreign embassy by invitation of the foreign diplomatic delegation. So the ...
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