56

Not only is this possible, it has been done. At least in Canada. On July 27th 2013 Sammy Yatim was on board a Toronto Transit bus and began brandishing a knife and threatening passengers. Constable James Forcillo of Toronto Police Service responded, and when Yatim ignored warnings and advanced towards police, Forcillo fired three shots, which felled Yatim, ...


52

Nobody so far has discussed Electoral law e.g. Representation of the People Act 1983 There are various clauses that may be relevant, one of which is: A voter shall be guilty of bribery if before or during an election he directly or indirectly by himself or by any other person on his behalf receives, agrees, or contracts for any money, gift, loan or ...


32

Yes, a person can be charged with the murder of person or persons unknown The reason that police are really keen to identify the victim include (in no particular order): It will probably clear up a missing persons case; So they can inform the next-of-kin; Being able to place a named person who loved and was loved before a jury rather than nameless corpse ...


31

Enforcement by firing a person could be a problem. There are specific allowed reasons to fairly fire an employee, which does not include "failure to vote". The description of unfair reasons includes, as an example, joining a trade union, and other actions that have some imaginable connection to the workplace. But the government has not clearly declared that ...


31

Can you legally be held responsible for attempted murder if the intended victim is already dead? In the circumstances described in the OP within england-and-wales Yes The offence may be found at s.1 of the Criminal Attempts Act 1981 (1) If, with intent to commit an offence to which this section applies, a person does an act which is more than merely ...


28

This seems to be a mix of question about law and a meta-question about this site, but I'll treat it as an on-topic question about law. The author of a question, or answer, owns the copyright to their contributions, and they can re-publish to their heart's content. Any user who posts here grants a license to SE and other users to use content posted here, so I ...


25

No All parties must agree to change a contract. On the face of it, the New Tenant has to be “acceptable to both the Landlord and the remaining individual or individuals comprising the Tenant (the Remaining Tenant)”. It goes on to describe what the landlord may consider in making this assessment; there is no such imposition on the Remaining Tenant. However, ...


23

Defamation requires communication to a third-party I can say (or write) anything I want about a person directly to that person and, unless it is a threat, they have no recourse at all. I can call them a liar, a thief, a Nazi, or a goat fornicator. Of course, I have to be careful – calling them a “bastard” might be a slur on their mother communicated to a ...


23

I would assume that the seller ('Transferor') still owned numbers 7 and 11 at the time of the sale. If so, this clause means that the owners of 7 and 11 (now and in the future) have a right of way on the path coloured blue on the plan. The land still belongs to number 9, but the owners cannot build on it so as to block the path. (As mckenzm comments, "on ...


23

There is no clear answer, and I suspect an argument could be made either way. The relevant regulations in this case are The Health Protection (Coronavirus, Restrictions) (England) Regulations 2020. In particular, regulation 6(1) states that: 6.—(1) During the emergency period, no person may leave the place where they are living without reasonable excuse....


18

In my opinion the other answers have missed an important provision of the Unfair Contract Terms Act 1977 (or even disregarded the act altogether). For illustration, compare the following two sections: Section 2(1) provides: A person cannot by reference to any contract term or to a notice given to persons generally or to particular persons exclude or ...


18

The Network Terms say: Subscriber Content You agree that any and all content, including without limitation any and all text, graphics, logos, tools, photographs, images, illustrations, software or source code, audio and video, animations, and product feedback (collectively, “Content”) that you provide to the public Network (collectively, “Subscriber Content”...


16

Dale M's answer pretty much covers it, but it sounds like this is a case of misunderstanding by the former employee rather than an actionable accusation. The way you have edited the documents will not harm his defence - if the details you removed are considered relevant, the court will order you to produce unedited documents. At that point, reproducing the ...


15

No. There's nothing in neither the Gambling Act 2005 nor the Police Regulations 2003 specifically preventing police officers from buying lottery tickets (or gambling in general for that matter). The principal requirement from the Police Regulations is at Schedule 1, para 1 which is to do it (like everything else in life) sensibly: A member of a police force ...


15

You can attempt to murder a dead man Or conspire to murder them for that matter. australia The precedents in Australia relate to receipt of stolen property that was not, in fact, stolen or drug offences that didn’t actually involve drugs but the principle is the same. However, the law in Australia depends on whether it would be “fair” in the circumstances to ...


12

Dead people have to pay their debts just like everybody else It is one of the primary roles of the executor to make sure this happens. Dead people can dispute a debt just like everybody else Just because someone says you owe them money, that doesn't mean you owe them money. In fact, the onus of proving the debt lies with the person claiming the money. ...


12

Short answer: no. You're likely to be right. The law will look at the contract in two ways that affect you. Landlord presumed to know what he contracted, since its his business Firstly, the fact that the landlord (I suspect) drafted it, and in any case entered it as his/her business. As with consumer law, the law assumes if you do something as a business, ...


10

The original level of the fines was set in regulation 4 of the Education (Penalty Notices) (England) Regulations 2007. This was then amended by regulation 2 of the Education (Penalty Notices) (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2012: Amount of penalty 2.—(1) Regulation 4 (amount of penalty) of the Education (Penalty Notices) (England) Regulations 2007 is ...


9

English common law has centuries of experience on this issue, and has developed some settled principles that are applied by the courts. Prior to 1925, references in contracts to months were interpreted as lunar months. There are 13 lunar months in a year. By section 61 of the Law of Property Act 1925, references in contracts to months are to ...


9

Unfortunately government "guidance" and police policy changes rapidly and is inconsistent, especially as the Regulations are made under health legislation, which is now a devolved matter so the four UK jurisdictions (England, Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland) all have similar-but-different rules and guidance. In terms of what exercise is reasonable, the ...


9

Who owns the rights to the question and can it be republished? The question is: which rights are you talking about? If you are talking about copyrights, then you "own" the copyrights. (I really dislike talking about rights, especially copyrights in terms of "ownership" as if they were a piece of property like a hammer that you loan your ...


8

See also the Employment Law Act 1996, which discusses statutory notice periods specifically, and in particular, s.210: (2) In any provision of this Act which refers to a period of continuous employment expressed in months or years— (a) a month means a calendar month On this basis, as well as dw's answer about the Common Law, one month's notice refers to a ...


8

(I am not your lawyer. I am not here to help you. If you are reading this because someone has died, please stop and instead read the Scottish Courts and Tribunals guide to dealing with a deceased's estate in Scotland, or contact a solicitor.) Yes, in general. Section 1 of the Wills Act 1963, which is in force in Scotland, specifies that "[a] will shall be ...


8

It says it's an "MP4 player" but it doesn't play MP4s. This seems rather straightforward to me---assuming it really doesn't play any kind of MP4 at all. I would agree you could go back to the shop armed with the appropriate wording from the SoG Act and state your case to the manager. If the front desk staff are unhelpful don't argue with them but rather ask ...


8

If you're an employer who really wants their employees to vote, there are much easier ways. Arranging a minibus to the voting booth and the rest of the afternoon off for those that go to the voting booth would be the most obvious solution. Compared to the cost of lawyering up and trying to put together a legally-enforcable contract, plus the cost of ...


8

It's the mechanism used to allow for adjournment debates: An adjournment debate is a way in the Commons of enabling a debate to take place but without a question which the House must then decide. An adjournment debate is held on the motion 'that the House (or sitting) do now adjourn'. There is a half-hour adjournment debate at the end of each day’s sitting. ...


8

You missed the important point. You can refuse all you want, but then the outgoing tenant cannot leave before the term of the lease. So either: they continue to pay (and you are most probably jointly liable for the payments if they don't) or you pay their share or you have to find a new tenant that is agreeable to both you and the landlord. Note that it's ...


7

You have asked about "United Kingdom", but I can only answer about England and Wales; the law in Scotland is very different (rather more different in some respects than the difference between E&W and the State of New York). There is no time limit per se on manslaughter charges; if the police find evidence for a manslaughter charge after 80 years, there ...


7

Although an academy is state-funded, it is not the government, so limitations on what a government is allowed to do are not applicable, and anyway there is no First Amendment separation of church and state in the UK. I presume your school has a formal faith designation, which means that it is not subject to Section 85 of the Equality Act 2010, which might ...


7

As someone who acts for both landlords and tenants I would say that I have never seen exclusions for personal injury or death in a commercial lease. I would recommend that you have the whole lease reviewed by a solicitor dealing in commercial property, particularly as, as has been stated in another reply, exclusion of liability for personal injury or death ...


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