16

In the United States at least, the answer is clearly "Yes". Absent some restrictive agreement to which the would-be blogger is explicitly a party, a person has a protected right to comment or report on events and publish opinions of them. The question does not mention a location or jurisdiction, and I am not suren what the law on this point might be in non-...


3

The "standard disclaimer" This is a work of fiction. Names, characters, places, and incidents either are products of the author's imagination or are used fictitiously. Any resemblance to actual events or locales or persons, living or dead, is entirely coincidental. has very little legal effect. If a plaintiff can demonstrate that the characters ...


3

The credits following a recorded video performance are both customary in the industry, and are also required by union the union contract that applies when the production company is a union shop. These customs have not been static, however, and the history of this particular practice (without its underlying legal context) is discussed in a relevant Wikipedia ...


2

No permission is required to refer to copyrighted material, or to characterize the content of such material. The form of the citation you give, if any (APA, MLA etc) depends on the standards of your discipline. There is no legal requirement to attribute ideas to a source, or to mention what works James T. Kirk figures in. Course projects on such content can ...


2

Great question! It's actually every episode of all three seasons of Fargo, as I recall. Fargo is not an advertisement. It is fictional content. You can say whatever your want in creative work, particularly in the US, so long as you're not violating copyright law. (False advertising is kind of wiggly, in that I often see or hear advertisements all the ...


2

I understand from elsewhere that it's necessary to lodge a complaint with the council the papers work their way from there to the Magistrate's court the Magistrate's court hear the case in 4 weeks, plus So the magistrate's court route won't work. What would work potentially is a judicial review in the hight court, plus an injunction to temporarily quash ...


2

In the United States, I don't know how you could be required to include an age-verification mechanism, as you're generally free to market and sell your game to minors. In Brown v. Entertainment Merchants Assn., 564 U.S. 786 (2011), video-game creators sued to prevent enforcement of a California law that prohibited the sale of violent video games to minors ...


1

Steam's side of the problem Consumer Side From Steam's point of view, every user of Steam has to be at least 13, because they positively affirmed to be so when they applied dor a steam account and confirmed Steam's TOS. It's a sentence that can't be bypassed even with parental consent, as it is a hard requirement for the contract to be valid: You may not ...


1

It’s not copyrighted but it is trademarked Names of businesses generally do not have copyright protection because they usually lack the necessary element of creativity required for a literary work. Either they are a name (e.g. Ford), a common word (e.g. Apple) or are purely descriptive (e.g. International Business Machines - IBM). However, they do have ...


1

Checking Cornell on copyright law, the reserved rights include public performance and public display. If you have a DVD legitimately, you still can't display or show publicly without a license. So, the question would seem to be if this is a public performance. A private performance is perfectly legal, and requires no further license. If the public is ...


1

There is no law that requires the showing of credits for anything. Showing credits at the nod of a movie or TV show is customary but not required. Attribution of another person's work is a matter of the licence that that owner has given.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible