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12

Yes, non-US citizens can own equity in US companies. To be specific: You do not have to be a citizen or resident of the US to own securities in a company incorporated in the US.


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In this context, the phrase "there are no equitable considerations that would require the court to reduce or deny reimbursement for the parents" largely refers to defenses to claims arising under the law of equity as applied historically in the chancery courts of England, and more recently, to claims of a type that would have been brought in equity courts if ...


5

Companies have a registry of their shareholders. Anyone with at least one share registered in their name is a shareholder of record. However, the vast majority of people who consider themselves "shareholders" aren't actually registered owners of a stock. Instead, almost all public stock in the US is held "in street name." That means that ...


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What we commonly refer to as the Common Law system, which originates from England and is the system used in most former English colonies including the USA, is actually two distinct strands of law: law and equity. Before 1873, England had two parallel court systems: courts of "law" which could only award money damages and recognized only the legal owner of ...


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Were two black men legally removed from a Philadelphia Starbucks? Maybe - its complicated. The crime of trespass in Pennsylvania relevantly involves: 3503 (b) Defiant trespasser.-- (1) A person commits an offense if, knowing that he is not licensed or privileged to do so, he enters or remains in any place as to which notice against trespass is given by: (...


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australia Companies can have different classes of shares with different rights: rights to dividends, voting, distribution of assets on winding up etc. Basically, it’s pretty much completely customisable.


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The DoJ is the USA Or, more precisely, the attorney general (the head of the DoJ) is the member of the cabinet that represents the United States Government in legal matters. The US government is a legal person and can sue and be sued (subject to sovereign immunity), just like any other person. When they do, the attorney general through the department of ...


3

Ohwilleke's answer (i.e. 'there isn't a simple answer') covers the general principles clearly. But for your specific situation (England and Wales, appeal to the High Court Chancery Division or Court of Appeal), the answer is "Do nothing irrevocable if possible; if necessary, apply for interim directions to the Court". The Chancery Masters are used to this ...


2

Sometimes people loan money to a company in a convertible debt transaction. This means that if a certain event happens a certain amount of debt loaned to the company by an investor is converted into a certain amount of equity (i.e. stock or a membership interest) in a company. "Upon conversion" when at the time that a debt to equity conversion is occurs ...


2

Which Companies Are Covered By SOX? When exactly does the Sarbanes-Oxley Act apply to a company? The provisions of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (a.k.a. SOX) sometimes apply to "issuers" (i.e. companies that are going public pursuant to the 1933 Securities Act and companies that have already gone public which are regulated by the 1934 Securities ...


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Generally speaking, no special paperwork is required for an American to own shares in a Canadian corporation.


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How do I interpret the above statement? It doesn't seem to say anything about my agreed on equity stake in the company as part of my compensation. You are right. The written clause is inconsistent with the verbal agreement. If you sign the written contract, it would supersede the verbal agreement because a contract typically replaces and supersedes any ...


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Short Answer You probably could, but it probably wouldn't be the best way to achieve the co-owners goals in most cases in England and Wales and in other countries with a land registration system. It is more attractive in the U.S. Long Answer England and Wales v. U.S. Analysis Compared The big factor that distinguishes England and Wales (and most but not all ...


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Given the statutory reference in the question, I assume that this question is about U.S. income tax laws. When you contribute property (money or in kind) to a corporation and receive initially offered or treasury shares in exchange from the corporation, under U.S. tax law, the transaction is a non-taxable contribution to capital. In the case of a cash ...


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Companys limited by shares1 always have shareholders When you apply to create a company it is created with the number and types of shares specified and are owned by the people nominated in the application form. Tax Shares in a newly founded company can be set at any value and their acquisition does not create a taxable event for either the founder(s) or ...


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This is a complicated area of business and law. As the letter says only the board can authorize the stock deal and any executive who promises otherwise is making a big mistake. If they were to grant you options at lower than the market value there can be imputed income now that you can be taxed on. Sometimes that is a good thing and there is form I once ...


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