33

You probably can't refuse to use such services. The relationship between you and these services is very different when you interact with them as a consumer, versus when these services are provided on behalf of your employer. In the latter case, the service is (or at least should be) bound as a data processor who can only* use your personal data as instructed ...


21

Your employer should have a Data Protection Officer. The first step when you have data privacy concerns at the workplace should be to talk to the DPO. An institution using software as a service by Microsoft, Google etc. will usually have a contract with the provider. This contract differs from the contract you have e.g. with Stackexchange, where you sign ...


5

There are no specific criteria for deciding whether a request is manifestly unfounded or excessive, because this depends very much on context. The ICO has given some clarifications, but they still won't tell you an allowed frequency of requests. We (as data subjects) should not invent particular criteria because they would be only our opinion. In any case, ...


4

In Spain, most traffic offenses are usually considered administrative sanctions and involve just a relatively small fine, and perhaps losing some points in your licence. In those cases, if the driver if the vehicle cannot be established (your example, or a far regular one of a parking violation in which the officer did not see who did park it and will not ...


3

australia The owner of the vehicle is legally responsible for knowing who is driving it at all times. If they can’t (or won’t) name the driver by statutory declaration they are fined for faking this duty. The fine is considerably more than the summary fine for the offence being equal to the maximum fine that a court can hand out.


2

Immigration is up to the individual EU member states. A work visa is only valid in that country. While you might have been able to work for a Portuguese employer remotely from France, your French visa did not authorize you to take up work in Portugal. The EU/EEA does have a concept of “freedom of movement”, meaning that an EU citizen has the right to work in ...


2

As others have alluded to, there are a number of different scenarios that can be read in to the OP.  Here's one... Re: the United Kingdom If this is a criminal act, and if the bullet can be recovered and if the police are investigating - the bullet will be seized as evidence and retained as police property. Once any investigations, trials and appeals have ...


2

GDPR Article 13 section 1 says: Where personal data relating to a data subject are collected from the data subject, the controller shall, at the time when personal data are obtained, provide the data subject with all of the following information: (a) the identity and the contact details of the controller and, where applicable, of the controller’s ...


2

Google has many different products and product tiers, and offers DPAs for some of them. E.g. Google does offer DPAs for business-oriented products like Google Workspace (formerly GSuite), Google Analytics, and Google Cloud. They do not offer DPAs for consumer-oriented products such as their free Docs and Gmail offerings. Even within paid offerings, Google ...


1

You can embed a third party button, but have to take care how and why you do this. PayPal is not providing the button solely on your behalf, but for their own purposes. They are not your data processor, but another data controller. Thus, you need a legal basis (Art 6 GDPR) for sharing visitor data with PayPal. You do have a legitimate interest to accept “...


1

can we presume their approval of data collection is still applicable My understanding is that by "make the connection" you mean that your system identifies that the individual who consented to tracking & data collection is the same person who logged in. If my understanding of your description is correct, then yes, your presumption of approval ...


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