5

The Protection from Eviction Act 1977 defines an excluded tenancy as, amongst other things, a tenancy that is granted for other than money or money's worth ((7)(a)). This means that someone who shares accommodation with the landlord does not have the protection from eviction that an ordinary tenant would have, as per Part 5. You should seek advice from a ...


4

Assuming you have an assured shorthold tenancy, it's not the landlord himself that can evict you. The process is that he serves you notice, and if you don't move by the time the notice period ends, then he has to go to court in order to obtain a court order to end the tenancy. The landlord must demonstrate to the court that he has properly served notice to ...


4

Note: All links in Spanish (sorry). Regardless or your father being or not the legal owner of the home, the issue at play is that of alimentos1. This is an obligation between some family relationships to help each other so if family member (the alimentista) is in dire need of help (i.e., needs the help to survive) the others have the obligation to provide ...


4

You understand the business of landlording before you get started. You don't landlord for the purpose of evicting someone. You landlord for the purpose of exchanging keys for a duration for money, specifically by creating a leasehold estate that you sell to your tenant. Your tenant has the leasehold, you don't have the money, in part because it sounds ...


4

Absolutely not. You have to use the legal system, whereby the sheriff is the one who uses force if it is necessary and ordered by the court. You can file an action at your local courthouse. If you want to do this self-help style, figure out how to file a petition, and figure out what you are petitioning the court to do. First off, of course, you need to ...


3

You can always politely ask a person to leave, which could solve your problem. If that doesn't work, you will have to take legal action: you cannot change the locks or force him out (without the risk of a costly lawsuit). In Washington this would probably be the slower ejectment process, since you are not in a landlord-tenant relation. The actual process ...


3

You said it yourself - "The only way for me to remove him is through an eviction process". From this link - give the tenant a non-payment termination notice, signed by yourself and including the address of the premises, the date the tenant needs to vacate (at least 14 days out) and the grounds for notice being non-payment of rent. The notice also needs ...


2

The short answer is no. You don't have to leave until the term of the lease ends or you are required to move based upon some new default under the lease. I'm not sure that there would be case law exactly. The default rule is that you don't have to move unless there is a reason that you have to move. The landlord brings suit under the law to get an order ...


2

Short Answer Typically, about four weeks in an uncontested case and six weeks in a contested case, although this depends to some extent upon how business the relevant courts are at the time. Long Answer The time limits break down as follows into different parts of the process: Minimum time from formally demanding possession to being legally allowed to ...


2

In NSW, Australia you have the right to decide who lives in your home, including adult children. You start by asking them to leave. If that doesn't work you can try mediation through a Community Justice Centre or a private mediator. If that doesn't work you can turn to the law. If they pay (or have paid) to live there (which may include performing ...


2

Under ARS 33-1308, which is part of the Arizona Residential Landlord and Tenant Act, the usual landlord/tenant requirements and protections do not apply to "Occupancy under a contract of sale of a dwelling unit or the property of which it is a part, if the occupant is the purchaser or a person who succeeds to his interest", which may apply to this situation. ...


2

First you need to verify the presence of squatters, as opposed to trespassers. The fact that the locks are changed suggests you've got people living in there on a non-temporary basis, which is the primary distinction between the two groups. It wouldn't hurt to also ask the police to take action; if they tell you it's a civil issue, that helps persuade the ...


2

First, I assume you mean that someone changed the lock and didn't give you a key. I also assume that you have the permission of the landlord or the local housing association for this subletting arrangement. And I also assume that the landlord gave the primary tenant permission to change the lock (and may or may not have a key, which they may or may not ...


1

A contract outside the law isn’t a contract The rather elaborate bells and whistles you propose around the agreement doesn’t change the fact that it is fundamentally a contract. If the tenants have rights, it’s extremely likely that the law will not allow them to contract to waive those rights and any contract that purports to do so would be void. ...


1

Contact the San Francisco Rent Control board and file a complaint IMMEDIATELY, as in FIRST THING IN THE MORNING. And I'm not certain why you have not contacted them yet. You need to contact the board as soon as you get a 3-day notice. That said, reasons for eviction in San Francisco that fall on the tenant's duties: Non-payment of rent or habitual ...


1

Property owners have the right, in general, to ask anyone to leave their property, and to use reasonable force if they fail to comply (note that in England and Wales there is no concept of 'criminal trespass'). If you have a tenancy agreement, there are clear laws regarding eviction, depending on the type of tenancy. If a tenant is paying (and continues to ...


1

There is a document, located on the New York State court system's website called NEW YORK CITY LANDLORDS & OWNERS. What do I do if the tenant is not paying me rent? If the tenant is not paying, you can start a nonpayment case to sue the tenant for rent. In a nonpayment case you ask the court to evict the tenant if the tenant doesn’t pay. What do I do ...


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