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You haven't said where you are. In England and Wales the usual practice in negotiation is that any offer is made "without prejudice". For example if you are claiming £1,000 and the defendant denies owing it they might offer you £500 to settle the claim. In this case the offer letter will have "without prejudice" in bold type at the top. This means that you ...


1

Is it bad to have communication with opposing party outside of court? Communication outside the court is not necessarily a bad idea. However, it is in your best interest to ensure that those communications be always in writing or --subject to any consent rules that may apply in your jurisdiction-- recorded. That is especially recommendable if you have ...


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No, it’s not bad In fact it can do a great deal of good. It’s entirely possible that you will negotiate a settlement that is better for both of you than court. Negotiations undertaken in such circumstances are inadmissible in court - the legal term is without prejudice. The reasoning is that is good public policy for parties to be able to resolve disputes ...


3

How can a person with a similar experience with the defendant, help the plaintiff in a lawsuit? You may bring Joe as witness or present some sworn testimony from him. That could be in the form of affidavit, deposition transcript, or by testifying in court. In what way can I use Joe's story? Joe's testimony will be relevant to the extent that it proves ...


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You and Joe could sue the landlord together, each claiming their own. Or you could call Joe as a witness. The court might be unwilling to admit Joe's testimony as it does not directly relate to your claim, but it's worth trying.


0

It's simpler to just get a process server. Courts tend to give significant deference to process servers, and if a process server says they delivered something, the court will generally take that as fact unless evidence to the contrary is presented. I don't understand what you mean by "the live streamed video will have to be made available to the public for ...


3

You can't give your landlord a "notice to quit" A "notice to quit" is something a landlord gives to the tenant under s8 or s21. Assuming you want to end the tenancy, you would give them whatever notice is required in accordance with the lease. Why the paranoia? Ending a residential tenancy is routine and would not normally land you anywhere near a court. ...


0

In most places, since "a trail lead to a dead person" you most likely have fulfilled your duties to find the rightful owner, and in most places if the rightful owner cannot be found, you would keep it. You would have to check exactly what laws apply. Different jurisdictions usually have roughly the same goals with their laws, so in the usually lost+found ...


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The link that you give is explicit about the information that is made public. Specifically, the decisions of the CRT are publicly posted and if they adjudicate the dispute then all evidence is public and available, presumably on request so it’s unlikely to show up in a search. This is a continuation of a long legal tradition that the government’s execution ...


3

Submit emails in their totality Your testimonial affidavit can quote or cite them as applicable. There is no protection of anyone’s privacy in court. By the way, the email where admissions were made is probably inadmissible if it was sent were in the course of bona fide negotiation to resolve the dispute. If the other party objects they will be thrown out -...


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