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3

The company probably owes U.S. and state corporate income taxes because income from services performed in the United States are usually considered "effectively connected" with the United States. The fact that the servers are located in the U.S. is pretty much irrelevant, relative to the fact that the services are performed while located in the United ...


3

No A government performing the functions of government (like issuing a visa) is not in a contractural relationship with the person they are doing it for so there is no basis in contract law for such a suit. It might be arguable that they were negligent, however, first they would have to agree to be sued as they have sovereign immunity, secondly you would ...


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You need a visa to travel to another country (unless there is a treaty between your country and their country that waives this e.g. Australia and New Zealand, the EU). If you aren't traveling there is no visa requirements. Technically the education is exported/imported and, like a TV, it doesn't need a visa.


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It depends. OPT work should be related to your field of study and the school/USCIS should be notified. Ask your school's DSO for more info. They should have informed you about these rules during orientation. Also note that some broker work requires a specific brokers license.


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Immigrant intent means intent to immigrate during this stay. When you enter on an F-1 visa, you are not supposed to have preconceived intent to file Adjustment of Status (I-485) during that stay. If the officer suspects that you intend to file I-485 during that stay, they can deny you entry. The fact that you are the beneficiary of a pending or approved ...


1

Naively, this does not appeared to be permitted for holders of F-1 Visas. M-1 Student Visa The M-1 visa (Vocational Student) category includes students in vocational or other nonacademic programs, other than language training. Employment F-1 students may not work off-campus during the first academic year, but may accept on-campus ...


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Her options are are limited to non-existent unfortunately. She should consult an attorney to see if the rare, but potential option for a U-Visa is possible.


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You need an attorney to advise you. When you speak with your attorney, make sure you are clear and ask her to advise you for the best way to comply with the law and not how to circumvent it.


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To my understanding, foreigners can own real properties in the United States. Therefore, they can legally rent out for a profit as income (notice legally). When those foreigners (aliens) study in the United States on F-1 Visa, I believe, they can still rent out their real properties pursuant to applicable laws. And it's not considered as employment as far as ...


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