7

There's good information at https://www.gov.uk/private-renting-tenancy-agreements/your-landlord-wants-to-end-your-tenancy. There are several types of tenancy with different rules, but in all of them, the landlord has to give you a certain amount of notice to move out, and it has to give a specific date. "Three months from when a buyer is found" doesn't ...


5

What that church is doing is legal. There is a statutory exception in the Fair Housing Act for religious and non-profit organizations. 42 U.S. Code § 3607 - Religious organization or private club exemption Nothing in this subchapter shall prohibit a religious organization, association, or society, or any nonprofit institution or organization ...


4

You can read about your rights as a California tenant at http://www.dca.ca.gov/publications/landlordbook/catenant.pdf This is rather ridiculous: 1) No judge will evict someone for paying rent by mail. (I assume you have the new landlord's address.) 2) If the landlord cashes the check you mail then he's not going to be able to claim you didn't pay the ...


4

The Code defines "Source of income" as: lawful, verifiable income paid directly to a tenant or paid to a representative of a tenant. There's nothing to suggest that the occupation is a relevant consideration otherwise. What it would mean is that if the occupation of a person is relevant to their source of income, it would be illegal to discriminate on ...


4

Education level is not an FHA protected category. However, whenever you give one broad group preferential treatment over another, you'll raise eyebrows. Someone might argue, for example, that while your incentive does not explicitly mention a protected category like race or sex, it might disproportionately impact one group in a protected category over ...


4

Yes, they can. How would they enforce it? It seems like the HOA would have to be able to request to see the tenant's credit report, background check, proof of income, and rent checks to make sure the rules are being followed. The HOA might have to make a rule giving it the right to audit members on pain of a fine or something. What is to ...


4

From what I can determine, there has not been a legal challenge to the practice that reached a high enough level to get on my radar, so it's not clearly prohibited or allowed. Turning to the relevant federal regulations, the implementation of the Fair Housing Act, the law hinges in part on an Aggrieved person includes any person who— (a) Claims to ...


4

NYC local laws are available here. There is a new law (152 of 2016) requiring inspection of gas piping systems every 5 years. There is a facade inspection rule (11 of 1998), other rules about elevators. Plumbing must be inspected when installed or modified (part of the permit process) but there is no law requiring periodic inspection of existing plumbing.


3

A "limited license housing agreement" may be an interesting attempt to get around landlord-tenant laws, typically associated with official student housing (e.g. this from Queens College CUNY). This facility near WMU is not overtly related to the university, but might be subcontracting for the university. At any rate, there is no special provision under ...


3

In Australia there is a specific exemption in the Sex Discrimination Act - s34(2): Nothing in Division 1 or 2 applies to or in relation to the provision of accommodation, where the accommodation is provided solely for persons of one sex who are students at an educational institution. Such exemptions are pretty universal in anti-discrimination laws.


3

Disclosures are prescribed by state law. Fair housing, which is a federal concept, pertains to issues such as using prohibited personal facts to determine whether to accept an offer. (Hazardous materials disclosures are also mandated at the federal level, but are are included in state requirements which can get pretty broad). If you are buying in ...


3

There are exemptions, and "justifications", in 24 CFR 100. The exemption is 100.10: (c) Nothing in this part, other than the prohibitions against discriminatory advertising, applies to: (1) The sale or rental of any single family house by an owner, provided the following conditions are met: (i) The owner does not own or have any interest ...


3

From the opinion in Fair Housing Council v. Roommate.com (2012): There's no indication that Congress intended to interfere with personal relationships inside the home. Congress wanted to address the problems of landlords discriminating in the sale and rental of housing, which deprived classes of housing opportunities. But a business transaction ...


3

The fair housing act does not mention "socially marginalized groups". It says that it shall be unlawful To discriminate against any person in the terms, conditions, or privileges of sale or rental of a dwelling, or in the provision of services or facilities in connection therewith, because of race, color, religion, sex, familial status, or national origin....


3

Not in the state of California. California law prohibits discrimination based on source of income; only discrimination based on amount of income is allowed. See the California Government Code, section 12955. It is not even legal to indicate a preferred source of income in the advertisement; landlords may ask prospective tenants about the source of income, ...


2

First and foremost, what does the lease agreement say. This is a binding contract and generally cannot be changed unilaterally. There are two issues here that need to be determined: Can, and if so how, the lease be transferred to a new landlord. Almost certainly the lease will address this issue and the new landlord must comply with these provisions There ...


2

If the tenant finds a new place to live before the end of the two months' notice and wishes to leave early, is the tenant required to [give] one month's notice that they are leaving? No, the tenant is not required to give notice if they has already received notice from the landlord. In addition, the tenant is required to pay rent up to the end of the ...


2

Put simply: the fair housing laws are there to protect the rights of tenants and potential tenants. They limit your negotiating power to the extent you are trying to do something that the law is designed to prevent. There are a lot of laws that could be described as "fair housing" laws, so it's hard to be more specific than that in response to this very ...


2

For California, this may be a useful guide. I assume the terms of the lease allow you to sublet (though I would be surprised if many leases actually allow it, without landlord approval). You would then have a sublease agreement with the subtenant (since you are still bound by the original lease and you want to be sure that you get the money so you can pay ...


2

The general rule is that all jobs must be open to "U.S. Workers." That is, citizens, permanent residences, asylees, and refugees. (8 USC 1324a). Advertising otherwise, is unlawful. There are some very limited exceptions to the general rule where U.S. Citizenship may be required, generally related to security. (e.g., requires a security clearance, police ...


2

This will be controlled by your contract of sale. Most contracts include a clause that basically says that the buyer has inspected the property and accepts it "as is." For example: Condition of Property. Purchaser acknowledges and represents that Purchaser is fully aware of the physical condition and state of repair of the Premises and of all ...


2

This might be illegal under the theory of disparate impact. Although non-students might not be a protected class in and of themselves, your policy would tend to give a relative disadvantage to members of some protected classes, e.g. people with any religion other than that of the college, or people with no religion. Depending on the demographics of the ...


2

Generally, an individual cannot be discriminated against on the basis of religion. However, churches have a large number of exemptions to this for some quite sensible reasons: for example, it is inconsistent with the objectives of the Catholic Church for their Cardinals to be atheists. It is not clear that these exemptions would apply but you can bet that ...


2

There are two possible scenarios: Your contract is with Bob, not with Peter. In this case it doesn't matter if Bob did not pay his part to Peter. Your contract with Bob does not involve him. Peter will have to ask the money from Bob. But that also means that, as long as you had access to the house, you are not entitled for a refund for the 450 €. The ...


2

Normally, in British courts, once a trial has been conducted, only the evidence admitted at that trial (called the "record") may be considered on appeal. Additional evidence demonstrating that the factual findings of the judge at the trial were incorrect may not be considered in an appeal. More generally, credibility determinations made by trial judges in ...


1

Essentially: your position is that a rent increase of that magnitude seems unreasonable; the landlord seeks to have an agreement such that they can lawfully increase the rent by 3-8% at their discretion at the end of each term; the landlord seeks to have an agreement such that you cannot legally challenge the increase. Should I be worried about this ...


1

Your actual inquiry boils down to the statutory interpretation of the aforementioned excerpts. A surcharge for additional roommates does not violate these statutes, since "being domiciled with" does not mean and does not imply "living in the same bedroom". Your knowledge that "X is Y'parent" is not discouraging you from renting your unit to them. In fact, I ...


1

There has to be a law that prohibits discrimination on that basis. Here is a list with mentions of the relevant law. Every state has some such laws. There is generally some agency that regulates the activity, so the Office of Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity within HUD creates and enforces various regulations in their sphere. So pregnancy is not a ...


1

The answer is right in the EEOC document you linked to: The law prohibits employers from hiring only U.S. citizens or lawful permanent residents unless required to do so by law, regulation or government contract. (emphasis mine) There are lots of jobs and programs that are restricted by statute. Most federal civil service jobs are limited to US ...


1

Indeed, rent stabilized apartments aren't subsidized, and neither is Mitchell-Lama. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitchell-Lama_Housing_Program, the first sentence of which reads The Mitchell-Lama Housing Program is a non-subsidy governmental housing guarantee in the state of New York. So Mitchell-Lama was designed specifically to be distinct from ...


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