41

No. The images are copyrighted, and you are using them in a way that would leave you with virtually no argument for fair use. The factors for fair use are set out in 17 USC 107, and they indicate that the courts would reject your use: The purpose and character of the use, including whether it is of a commercial nature or for nonprofit educational purposes: ...


24

Many D&D monsters and creatures are based on creatures occurring in folklore and myth, such a vampires and trolls. Those are in the public domain, and anyone may use them freely. But images published as part of D&D, or by independent artists, are subject to copyright, and may not be used without permission. As the answer by bdb484 says, there seems ...


18

If the photos are exact or "slavish" reproductions of flat (2D) art, then under Bridgeman Art Library v. Corel Corp., 36 F. Supp. 2d 191 (S.D.N.Y. 1999) the photos are not original, and have no copyrights of their own. If the art was not under copyright (for example published before 1924) then neither are the photos. If the art is still under copyright, the ...


17

As noted in other answers, no, you are not allowed to use these creatures under Fair Use. You could go back to their original mythological underpinnings (for those that have them), but you would have to take great care to make sure everything about them you describe comes from myth and not from D&D. There is another option, however. Many Dungeons & ...


4

If this is a class assignment to create a game that you have no intention of distributing or selling, then I think you qualify for fair use. Within the context of a college class, it should qualify as educational. If you are creating a game aimed at the college marketplace that you intend to distribute and/or sell, then it is more complicated. Obviously you ...


4

The question as worded implies that if something is a parody it is automatically fair use or allowed in US copyright law. This is a myth. First of all, in a copyright context, the term "parody" is somewhat limited. In that sense, a "parody" is a new work which comments on the original (often but not always by mocking or ridiculing the original). A mere ...


4

(Note: the answer below deals with US copyright law only.) There are specific carve-out in the "fair use" law for "scholarship" and "research": Notwithstanding the provisions of sections 106 and 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phonorecords or by any other means specified by that section, for ...


4

THE FOLLOWING OPINION IS NOT LEGAL ADVICE Based on your screenshot and description, I don't see anything infringing. If the data you are using is from your own sources, and what you show is not a scan or photo of their guide, and your layout is thus unique in specifics (not a direct copy), it wouldn't be an "infringement" as far as copyright law is ...


4

Video would not be transformed in any way, and discussion would take place on reddit or other discussion platforms. So you are copying someone else's video and reposting it verbatim and in full in vimeo, without adding any additional content of your own? What is even the need for it? If you want to discuss the video in Reddit or similar, you can link to ...


3

The opera may be in the public domain, but unless the performance is from several decades ago, which I assume is not the case, the performance is not in the public domain. The video therefore has copyright protection of its own. The use to which you want to put the video does not sound like fair use to me, although as the other answer notes that's ...


3

Fair use is a four-factor test. Whether the use is commercial is part of just one of the four factors. Fair use is determined on a case by case basis, and it would be rather silly to assume that everything a user could post would be covered by fair use. Rather than just rely on the possibility of fair use, you may want to utilize the DMCA protections. Doing ...


3

The first question is whose law you are concerned with, since in principle you might have violated copyright law in any country, and might be sued under the laws of multiple countries. The US has a concept of "fair use" which is notoriously difficult to apply. When you are sued in the US, you can defend against the allegation by arguing certain things: ...


3

The details of this specific matter are not clear because it appears that Mane6 relented in response to a cease and desist letter, rather than be dragged through court. Since we are not privy to the letter from Hasbro, the best we can do is guess based on the degrees of freedom that exist under the law. The claim that this game was a "parody" is an ...


2

Fair use is judged on a case by case basis, according to the four factor test. Purpose and character of use: Although your use is for-profit, it is transformative. You reproduction of a single quote does not supersede the original book - paying the card game is not something people would do instead of reading the books. When there is a clearly ...


2

The phrase "All rights reserved" was required under the Buenos Aires Convention a copyright treaty dating from 1910. All parties to the Buenos Aires Convention have now signed the Berne Copyright Convention which is adhered to by all but a handful of countries, making the Buenos Aires Convention effectively obsolete Therefore, the phrase "All rights reserved"...


2

The standard answer is, there is a concept of Fair Use under which one might legally copy stuff. But it is impossible to definitively determine whether a particular use would be found to constitute fair use. In lieu of permission, you can (1) take your chances or (2) hire an attorney to give you a detailed analysis based on the specifics of the case and then ...


2

You would either be concerned about fair use in the US, or fair dealing in the UK (it is unclear who would have standing to sue you for infringement, but it is not Netflix. Probably Channel 4, UK). The UK doctrine is more limited than the US fair use doctrine. §30 of the UK law seems to be what is relevant: usage requires "sufficient acknowledgement". It is ...


2

If you make a whole copy of a book without permission, that would be infringement and not fair use, and you would be liable to that extent. If you make a further copy from it of a limited portion of the work and distribute it, in a manner consistent with fair use law, that is fair use, and you are not liable for that copying. Subsequent copying is not ...


2

fair-dealing is prescriptive, fair-use is not fair-dealing Copyright Acts in fair dealing jurisdictions enumerate what uses of copyright material are not infringements if the material is dealt with fairly (generally without actually defining fair dealing). For example, in australia, fair dealing can be argued if the use is for: news reporting; criticism ...


2

All rights reserved When someone says "all rights reserved" on copyright material, what does that mean? Well, the rights that copyright gives vary slightly by jurisdiction but takingaustralia as pretty representative, they are spelled out in s31 of the Copyright Act 1968: (1) For the purposes of this Act, unless the contrary intention appears, ...


1

Yes. The logo is a work of art and thus is copyright protected. The name of the company the logo represents is not copyrighted in and of itself and may be refereed to by a legal name in documentations so long as you do not use the logo image as requested.


1

17 USC 106 states what are the exclusive rights of the copyright holder in the US: the exclusive rights to do and to authorize any of the following: (1) to reproduce the copyrighted work in copies or phonorecords; (2) to prepare derivative works based upon the copyrighted work; (3) to distribute copies or phonorecords of the copyrighted ...


1

It's of course safest to obtain licenses for any copyrighted work you use, but I see a strong argument supporting a fair-use defense here. The factors for fair use are set out in 17 USC 107: The purpose and character of the use, including whether it is of a commercial nature or for nonprofit educational purposes: Your use is educational, which cuts in ...


1

Game mechanics are not normally covered by copyright protection. boardgames.SE Q: What aspects of a game are not protected under copyright?


1

Say I wrote a spy novel, in which some character refers to my protagonist as "Mr Bond" suggesting that he thinks of himself as a "master spy" like the movie character. Would that infringe a trademark on "James Bond" (assuming, for the moment that that name is trademarked)? No it would not. Or suppose my main character mentions having met Bond years ago ...


1

It’s not copyrighted but it is trademarked Names of businesses generally do not have copyright protection because they usually lack the necessary element of creativity required for a literary work. Either they are a name (e.g. Ford), a common word (e.g. Apple) or are purely descriptive (e.g. International Business Machines - IBM). However, they do have ...


1

The declaration "All rights reserved" has the same effect as the declaration "Copying will be punished by life in prison": none. With no statement, copyright law says what you can and cannot do. A statement can be added to grant a right normally reserved to the copyright holder, but cannot take away a right statutorily granted. Your described use is the ...


1

It seems that you don’t understand what parody is. If you do understand, please explain how it’s even possibly to parody computer code. What you can do with “open source” code depends on the licence the copyright holder(s) release it under. For some very permissive licences you can do what you suggest, for most, you can’t.


1

I will only address the legal question asked, about a fair use defense of such copying. I presume that the copyright holder has refused permission to use the figure for free (or perhaps at all), or else the right-holder is uncontactable. If the former, you have a good estimate of the chances of getting sued. Fair use is determined via a balancing act ...


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