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6

Because kidnapping is a violation of state law, the Colorado Bureau of Investigation would have jurisdiction to investigate. Assuming the crime occurred in the sheriff's home county, the undersheriff would take over and could also investigate. And if the sheriff is missing for more than 24 hours, federal law assumes that he was kidnapped using the ...


5

If the FBI has reason to believe they have committed a crime under US law Being an official of a foreign (or domestic) government in a military or civilian capacity does not make a person immune from US law except in the specific case of diplomatic immunity. There are some US laws that apply even if the perpetrator is not and has never been in the US, for ...


5

It is not a crime or a tort to accidentally sign in to an email provider with an incorrect email address, even if that address is actually held by some other person. Not attempting to enter a password or repeat the attempt makes it clear there was no intent to obtain unauthorized access, and the emails make that even more clear.


4

A warrant is required: you cannot just bust into a home because the owner died. Nothing that you describe resembles the kind of emergency situation that allows a warrantless search. In order to get a warrant, you have to have a good enough reason. Suppose that campus police found a suspicious object at the scene which was evidence of a crime and which had an ...


4

From the article: The FBI is investigating alleged computer intrusion and theft against an unidentified “victim corporation” involving “confidential or proprietary information,” including tests, test forms and internal emails, according to a search warrant issued in the case. The reference to "computer intrusion" is not precise, but may mean that they ...


3

The federal Hobbs Act has been interpreted to prohibit state and local officials from accepting bribes, under the theory of "extortion under color of right". Violation of the Hobbs Act is a federal felony, so the FBI here is investigating a federal crime, which is their job. As explained on Wikipedia, it has been common since the 1970s for federal law ...


3

None of the above. A grand jury issues an indictment. It usually (universally?) does so at the recommendation of a federal prosecutor, who may decide based on a recommendation from the FBI. This is required by the 5th Amendment, which says "No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of ...


2

Outside of the Counterintelligence list, there are no North Korean, Chinese, or Russian military officers or government officials are on any of the FBI wanted list. The Counterintelligence list includes one Chinese military officer, but no Russian or Korean military officers (though it is possible albeit unlikely that the three Russians on the list are in ...


2

So, the bad news, yes, possessing this may violate copyright laws and you could be at risk of that association. Now, the good news, is that the FBI has more important things to do than to bust some kid over one pirated iteration of a game (I mean... they just raided the offices of the President's Lawyer... you're not even big enough to be considered a small ...


1

The FBI doesn't sit around waiting for other agencies to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that the FBI has jurisdiction. The FBI is allowed to be proactive: they have every right to investigate whether a case falls in their jurisdiction. Of course, that involves the same sleuthing needed to solve the case itself. As an example, the FBI did respond to the ...


1

It depends on what the FBI is ordering the business to do, and on why and how the order is made. If the FBI orders the business to commit a crime, then then the business is not only not obligated to carry out the order, but it is obligated not to carry out the order. It is of course unlikely for the FBI to order anyone to break the law, but there are ...


1

Just about anything is reportable to the FBI or any other US law-enforcement agency if the reporting person honestly thinks it is evidence of a possible crime. If the agency does not agree, they may well ignore the report. "Confidential" information may still be reported if a reasonable person would think it evidence of a crime. (Exceptions: ...


1

There is no law against unknowingly or even knowingly coming to possess a CD which contains illegally copied software. Installing or using it as software (as opposed to as a coaster) is illegal. Installing it, even if you don't know that the copy is pirated, is copyright infringement. So you were at risk, but dodged that bullet. Suppose that somehow you had ...


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