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The FDA promulgates regulations regarding what "cream cheese" etc. is, in 21 CFR Part 133 which covers cheese and related products. Cream cheese is described in ยง133.133, and there are sections on cottage cheese, cheddar, and so on. There is no general definition of "cheese" in this part, nor in related Part 131 covering milk and cream. Although there is no ...


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The FDA approved the device as requiring a prescription (not OTC). FDA regulations govern the manufacture or distribution of devices and drugs, not the consumption. An overview of FDA regulation is here. They say they they are "responsible for regulating firms who manufacture, repackage, relabel, and/or import medical devices sold in the United States". The ...


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Why would the FDA limit actionable material that may enhance treatment? Because the FDA has a bunch of regulations that say if you are going to sell a medical test you first have to prove that it is safe, accurate, and effective. The genome scan companies first had to prove that their genome scans were accurate and had sufficient quality controls built in....


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Here is the state of California code regarding the question. I am sure a state by state inquiry could reveal other statutes. http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/cgi-bin/displaycode?section=pen&group=00001-01000&file=565-566 In California there is no specific registry but registration is performed by marking the container with a registered brand.


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The FDA is a federal agency and is not going to be a first investigator for a local food or health issue. Contact your local city/county health department with your story and ask them how to get the food sample to them; and ask them if they have any health violations on file for the buffet restaurant. There are urban legends about the meat(s) that have ...


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An in-house made product is not regulated by the FDA. FDA regulates all foods and food ingredients introduced into or offered for sale in interstate commerce, with the exception of meat, poultry, and certain processed egg products regulated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Examples of Food businesses NOT regulated by FDA: Retail ...


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This summary from UrbanAgLaw.org (formerly run by the Sustainable Economies Law Center, but no longer updated) gives a summary of the US federal laws: Traditionally, the FDA has been concerned primarily with fruits & vegetables that travel in interstate commerce (i.e., fruits and vegetables that are sold and/or transported across state lines); however, ...


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Via the Insulin Amendment Act, later repealed, and the Durham-Humphrey Amendment, the federal government gained the power to regulate insulin, and the Keefauver-Harris Amendment imposed regulatory requirements for proving safety and effectiveness. If you want to get in the business of manufacturing pork insulin (nobody in the US does: there are no approved ...


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