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If you want to understand how federal law on lead affects shooting ranges, it probably won't be very helpful just to find the relevant statutes. Most of those statutes empower some agency to implement the statutes by creating standards for businesses such as shooting ranges. These standards, not the statutes, are what shooting ranges actually care about, ...


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I don't see a problem. Colt may be a brand name that's still in use, but that's being used nominatively. Trade Marks protect abuse of a name, not the correct use. You may use Colt to name real Colts, not a cheap Chinese knock-off. In this case, it's an in-game virtual gun, but it still represents the original. You might get into problems if you name your ...


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This article (warning: TVTropes) discusses several reasons why you might want to avoid this, as the name of the gun may be trademark, but the unique likeness of the gun may not be. It's done with other products (Rock Star games for example, uses this with Guns and Cars, and Pokemon games do this with map locations) to avoid any unfortunate implications of ...


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Note, Washington State Senate Bill 5061 seeks to block certain "untracable" firearms without a serial number. This relates in part to "3D printable" guns, but the act of milling of a 80% lower (in Washington) could be a violation, if and when it passes. But it appears the bill hasn't been made a law yet... Is Washington specific news this issue what drives ...


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