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3

The question is not firmly settled under Florida law. Wheeler v. State, 203 So. 3d 1007 addresses the issue w.r.t. Fla. Stat. §827.01(2), now §827.03(1)(a)3 and the crime of aggravated child abuse, which depends on causing "great bodily harm, permanent disability, or permanent disfigurement". The court notes that the chapter does not define "...


1

Unknowingly, it's not punishable. Knowingly, it's a crime. Fact is, the ID isn't even the property of the person it is issued to, it is property of the state issuing it, given to the person to identify themselves to the authorities. The employer and any person finding an ID is usually obligated to turn it over to the authorities. Merely having it in their ...


2

Typically, this kind of action would not be handled as a criminal offense. There are other contexts that are more likely to come up. The civil and criminal cases aren't the same. In a criminal case, the prosecution has a duty to provide evidence that it has to the defense upon request, but the defense has no parallel obligation due to protections against ...


1

An attorney is ethically obligated to receive client approval for any plea, and this must as a matter of criminal procedure, this must generally be approved by a personal signature or open court statement of the defendant and not his (or her or their) lawyer. If the attorney says this, and the court accepts the plea without modification and does not remove ...


3

Not necessarily. Let's say the victim delivered photos of a harm that were alleged to be done by the defendant. That's a crime in itself. But based on this item the DA orders investigation and finds evidence of a real crime. Discovering that the photo was faked can lead to dismissal (with prejudice), but even without the fake photo, there might be a strong ...


5

All your work is yours. They've made it very clear it wasn't a work for hire, so it's yours. They can't copyright any of their ideas. You can't copyright an idea. Only specific creative elements authored by them and present in your work could be covered by copyright. You didn't use their block diagrams. I don't see how references to other sites to look at ...


4

With competent legal advice you might get them to sign a waiver that they relinquish any claim to your work. There may be an argument that you had a verbal/email contract that your relied on (magic words). The list of names might be the only thing that is theirs. On the other hand, I learned many years ago that there is no contract wording between you and ...


2

Experience is cheap at any price The web site is not theirs but it’s not clearly yours either because of the sketch design by your not client. Take it down from public view, don’t try to sell it and get on with something new. While legally, you may be within your rights, it seems, given the litigious nature of your “client”, you may have to fight for them in ...


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