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74

An essential component of your contract with them is that they will provide you with food free of animal stuff (the exact nature of "vegan approved" may be up for debate, but actual meat should not be included). So they breached their contract with you, and you might sue them for breach of contract. The case of Gupta v. Asha (orders were mixed up) could be ...


63

The goal of civil proceedings is to make the injured party whole. Your damages amount to the cost of the meal that you ordered. You have no other demonstrable, concrete damages. If you were, for example, so deeply emotionally scarred by eating the food Chipotle offered that you developed an eating disorder and needed to see a therapist, you could probably ...


10

You are referring to article 9 of Regulation (EU) No 1169/2011 which contains: Article 9 List of mandatory particulars In accordance with Articles 10 to 35 and subject to the exceptions contained in this Chapter, indication of the following particulars shall be mandatory: (...) (l) a nutrition declaration. In a comment you clarify that you are talking ...


8

It isn't obvious that one must be certified to advertise your product as "Kobe Beef" in the United States. The designation "Kobe Beef", in theory, is supposed to operate a lot like a trademark, but it is a geographic designation that presumably belongs to officials from the geographic area, rather than a true trademark that is owned by a private individual ...


5

The primary source of law is the various laws passed by Congress known as the FD&C Act and which is codified in the relevant part at 21 USC 352(e)(1)(A)(iii), which says the established name of each inactive ingredient listed in alphabetical order on the outside container of the retail package and, if determined to be appropriate by the Secretary, ...


5

Neither law has precedence - manufacturers have to obey both. The FD&C says that they don't need to list ingredients which are trade secrets; the CFR says they must. If they list the trade secrets they do not break either law. If they don't, they break the CFR. Conclusion: they must list the trade secret ingredients. If the FD&C said it was ...


5

A "similar brand", even a "knock off", does not infringe trademark protection (which is the issue here, not copyright) as long as reasonable consumers or purchasers will not be confused or mislead into thinking that the product is the same as the original product, or is made by, affiliated with, sponsored by, or authorized by the makers of the original ...


5

Can I sue If I was served a real burger after requesting a veggie burger I agree that this inquiry significantly overlaps with the post of which this one is marked by NuclearWang as possible duplicate. Thus, the answers (such as why breach of contract is inapplicable) and comments provided there largely apply here. I will only address the slight ...


5

I don't know of any federal law that is violated. US labor law is generally favorable to employers, compared to many other countries, and gives employers a lot of freedom in setting policies and rules, The theory is that an employee who doesn't like it can go and work somewhere else, and an employer with unreasonable policies will eventually be unable to ...


5

Aspects of a cake's design can be protected by copyright. But, there are a few hurdles. First, the design needs to be original. That is, it has to be an exercise of a modicum of creativity. (Feist Publications, Inc., v. Rural Telephone Service Co., 499 U.S. 340 (1991)) Most important though, the aspect of the design that the author seeks to protect via ...


5

There appear to be no explicit federal laws against the practice. Each state has its own laws and many would depend on the individual interpretation of the genera "Humane Treatment of Animals" statutes. It appears that individual states do have laws against killing cats and dogs for food. The California law also protects "any animal traditionally or ...


5

A very good starting point is the webpage of the IHK Munich ("The Chamber of Commerce and Industry (IHK) for Munich and Upper Bavaria") for people who want to import food as a business. It is in German, but Google translate might be helpful. They say in their introduction: Food imported into Germany must not only comply with European food law, but ...


4

Serbia is not in the EU nor internal market, so when importing products you would have to follow specific product requirements, pay eventual import duties and internal taxes (VAT). I would recommend checking out the European Trade Helpdesk for more information about this. As both Hungary and Sweden are in the internal market it should be the exact same ...


4

"When ever I enter my college I'm forbidden to drink energy drinks..." You are under a contract and bound by the rules and regulations of the college; read the contract you signed when you registered for classes and paid tuition. That contract will stipulate what you are allowed to do and not do in classes, in your interactions with tutors and faculty, and ...


4

Depending on the bleach, you could have just killed the customer, so why in hell are you worried about being sued (to which the answer is a solid “yes”, by the way)? Most bleaches are a horrific poison for which there is little recourse once swallowed - it can easily result in death or permanent life altering injuries. Being arrested for manslaughter or ...


4

What would be the most reasonable thing to do? Live with it. Oh, and stop breaking the law with your automated emails. Illegality on their part does not justify illegality on your part. Also, it’s likely that this activity has caused your email address to be blocked automatically which may explain why they aren’t contacting you. From a legal point of view, ...


3

Arizona law operates in terms of "spirituous liquor", which is defined as containing more than 0.5% alcohol by volume. You'd have to send the cheese to a lab to determine the actual alcohol content, but it is likely that the product has less than the threshold amount of alcohol. It is not clear why vanilla extract is not classified as a spirituous liquor, ...


3

The exact answer will depend on the details (scale of the operation, where it is happening, what purpose the crickets are being sold for etc.), but in general: Yes, breeding and selling crickets is allowed in general. Here's an article (German) on someone who plans to breed insects for food (the article only says he is breeding "Heuschrecken", which could ...


3

According to the LA County Public Health Department: "Food facility" means an operation that stores, prepares, packages, serves, vends, or otherwise provides food for human consumption at the retail level, including, but not limited to, the following: An operation where food is consumed on or off the premises, regardless of whether there is a ...


3

The House of Representatives in September 2018 passed this bill to ban slaughter or commerce in dog or cat parts for human consumption.


3

Recipes themselves are not protectable as intellectual property and a meal made with a recipe is, therefore, not a derivative work (because the meal is not derivative of the particular expression of the recipe which is entitled to protection). The precise expression of a recipe on a printed page is protectable, but that is all. Ideally, you wouldn't read or ...


3

You clarified in the comments that some examples are wine. According to German law implementing EU law, alcoholic drinks are not covered by the nutrition labeling requirement. Consumer groups demand going beyond EU requirements in this regard, but it hasn't happened yet.


2

EU Regulation 1169/2011 Article 17 requires that The name of the food shall be its legal name. In the absence of such a name, the name of the food shall be its customary name, or, if there is no customary name or the customary name is not used, a descriptive name of the food shall be provided. I am not sure how you look up whether a food has a ...


2

The issue that I think you might face is a trademark problem. You can buy and resell stuff as is, but in re-packaging you might face the question of whether Oreos From Khadloya is confusingly similar to Oreos. There is a case (Farouk Systems, Inc. v. Target Corp. Inc., Case No. 06-20883; 2008 U.S. App. LEXIS 1225) where Target boxed hair stuff into a package:...


2

There isn't likely to be a single universal definition; a word can be defined in different ways for different laws. It's entirely possible that these laws have no more specific definition of "food" than what you've found. In that case, a court interpreting the law would presumably follow the plain meaning rule, under which "ordinary words have their ...


2

I don't see why sending them seperately should be illegal. Kinder Surprise chocolate eggs are illegal in the USA under 21 U.S. Code § 342 - Adulterated food (emphasis mine): A food shall be deemed to be adulterated— [...] (d) Confectionery containing alcohol or nonnutritive substance If it is confectionery, and— (1) has partially or ...


2

Unfortunately you cannot, the only solution is to stop at a shop after school finishes and buy an energy drink from there. Then you can drink it as you are not at school anymore.


2

The FDA is a federal agency and is not going to be a first investigator for a local food or health issue. Contact your local city/county health department with your story and ask them how to get the food sample to them; and ask them if they have any health violations on file for the buffet restaurant. There are urban legends about the meat(s) that have ...


2

But they do this with ever single other item to, how do they get away with this, or pay for the rights? There are different approaches. One solution is to copy in a way that does not infringe any legal rights of the original producer. It is a common misconception that "copying is forbidden" in general, but this is not true. Rather, there are various ...


2

FD&C allows keeping of trade secrets. CFR says the inactive ingredients must be disclosed when a safety factor. Let's say we have an inactive ingredient that is a trade secret that is also a safety factor. That is incorrect. In terms of medicines, it says the inactive ingredients must be listed, not that they must only be listed if they are a safety ...


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