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I was told that when you sign something in the UK, then it is your signature, no matter what name you are using. So if you sign a contract with my name, then it's your signature and you are bound by the contract. Things might be invalid because you signed and not me. For example, if you sign a contract selling my car in my name, then that contract is not ...


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The first step you could take would be to report the forgery to the police with the name of the person committing it, and the name of the buyer and what you heard from her that she observed him doing and saying. One thing that this does is that it commits your statement to a third party in a verifiable way before a dispute arises between you and either of ...


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Using any altered document is a crime in most jurisdictions, and in the U.S., most states count it as a potentially serious felony punishable by prison time and/or fines. As for it not "harming" anyone, if you are defrauding someone else, you're causing harm. There are many legal reasons that companies must care about whether their customers are of legal ...


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Your passport is not yours, it is owned by the government and altering it, even in a digital copy, is a serious crime. For example, passport fraud in Australia attracts a penalty of 10 years jail or a fine of 1,000 penalty units (currently $180,000).


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The following answer applies in the situation where all countries involved are member states of the European Union: Can the tax services in countryA confiscate accounts that are opened in countryB by me? All countries in the European Union (EU) are party to the Brussels Regulation (Regulation No. 1215/2012), this regulation means that judgments made in ...


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Given that you voluntarily turned the car over to the buyer, it isn't your car anymore. The correct procedure would be to file a civil case against the buyer for breach of contract, where he would have been required to turn over the pump or compensate you monetarily. You both violated the law and are subject to punishment. Forgery is a crime in California ...


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Take the laws of Washington to be typical. RCW 9A.60.010 defines crucial terms: To "falsely complete" a written instrument means to transform an incomplete written instrument into a complete one by adding or inserting matter, without the authority of anyone entitled to grant it; and: "Forged instrument" means a written instrument which has been ...


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The issues here are fraud and false documents (forgery). While the mere possession of false documents is not necessarily a crime, the use of false documents in order to obtain a financial advantage is fraud, which is a crime defined by statute in all states. States may also have specific provisions relating to the possession of falsified documents, but ...


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Am i going to jail? I'm so scared. No, probably not. The details depend on jurisdiction, but normally the only crime you could be accused of would be that of forgery. However, forgery by definition requires an "intention to deceive". So my personal advice would be to come clean immediately: Go to your employer, and tell them you did not understand the ...


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"Tamper" implies action taken with intend to improperly change the meaning. "Alter" simply means "change". "Mutilate" simply means "damage" but in this context implies "Make unreadable". "Obliterates" here means 'make unreadable" or "remove". As a practical matter, there is not much if any difference between these words in this context, and no authority ...


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What if somebody copies your signature on a contract that says you can't sue them? what can the judge do to stop this paradox? I will assume that by "copying the signature" you mean "without the person's consent". In that case, the contract is void and consequently unenforceable. However, it would need to be proved that the person whose signature was ...


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You can ask a law enforcement officer or district attorney to press charges. Generally, you cannot do so yourself. In practice, this kind of allegation is almost never criminally prosecuted. A prosecution would be particularly unlikely if the witnesses and/or notary confirmed his story that it was your father's signature or was authorized, and if the lawyer ...


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This is an interesting question and one that does not have a uniform answer. For example, in Colorado, while there is a court proceeding by which you can change your name, there is also case law precedent that says your legal name is what you go by even if it doesn't match your birth certificate or other official records.* For example, I have a client who ...


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Your main concern is not actually the signature on the bill of sale, its getting your money back. The bit with the signature might be leverage, but you need to focus on the money first. If you complain to the DMV first there is a risk that ownership of the car will revert back to Mr B but you won't get your money back. It sounds like this was a very ...


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California law Cal. Pen. 470 penalizes forgery, but also requires there to be an intent to defraud. Since this is a crime, you don't prove anything, you simply report it to the police and they decide whether it is worth pursuing. So ultimately, there would have to be good evidence of an intent to defraud in signing your name. The question that you would have ...


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whether they can confiscate or do something to my property here until I figure all this out Yes Assuming that a court in your home country has confirmed the debt (a judgement debt), the debtor can take that to a court in your new country for enforcement - garnishee of wages or bank accounts, seizure of property etc. Hire a lawyer and sort it out.


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The contract based on the fraud is voidable and all three are criminals Your husband and sister are guilty of fraud, your son of accessory to fraud. All three are also guilty of a criminal conspiracy to commit fraud. Punishment varies, for example, in new-south-wales fraud has a maximum penalty of 10 years gaol. These are unlikely to be at the maximum end ...


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australia Up to 10 years in prison Part 5 of the NSW Crimes Act 1900 deals with forgery and s253 specifically deals with making a false document - it doesn't matter if that false document is a will or anything else. As an aside using a false document, possessing a false document and having materials designed for making false documents carry the same ...


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There is a bit of unclarity in relevant details in the question. There are two kinds of legal outcomes given the apparent scenario. One is that the broker might be criminally prosecuted for forgery, and possibly perjury. The premise here is that he forged a contract and your signature, and also used this as evidence in a legal proceeding. You would need to ...


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Forgery is typically a felony; but it's not certain that the act in question satisfies the requirements of a forgery statute. In Washington, that is RCW 9A.60.020. Signing another person's name is not necessarily forgery. First, there has to be an intent to injure or defraud, then the document must be "falsely made, completed, or altered". That in turn means ...


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It's hard to say. I think the forged signature might not be a crime by itself, but whoever did this had some reason - instead of a sales agreement that states (with signatures) that Mr. X sold a car to Mr. Y, there is now an agreement that states (with forged signatures) that Mrs. Jones sold a car to Mr. Y. I could imagine that somewhere along the line ...


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Is a document considered falsified just because it has no stamp or signature? No. A lack of a signature or stamp could be one piece of evidence suggesting that a document is falsified or fabricated, but there is no universal requirement that a document have a signature or stamp, and even if one is missing there are a variety of legitimate reasons (e.g. ...


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If you employ a professional, it is precisely beacuse he knows more about the area than you do; in this case not how to show the other side are untrustworthy, but specifically how to win this suit. You can (and probably should, assuming you are happy to pay for the time) ask your attorney how and whether he is going to use the evidence of fraud, but that is ...


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Obviously, no one is supposed to forge a signature on a passport application or anything else. Usually, however, criminal liability for forgery only arises when the fraud is material. In other words, if it is used to gain some significant benefit or cause some harm that wouldn't have been possible without the signature. It is unlikely that this would be ...


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A legal remedy is for some injury done to you. Any possible forgery could only damage you if your good name was injured, perhaps by a master claiming that you had approved his seamanship and then putting his next command ashore. Whether or not you could then sue him (it would be fact-dependent, though I think it unlikely), you have no remedy for damage that ...


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Probate law is complex, and varies by jurisdiction, but in principle a will with a forged signature should be set aside. In England and Wales, anyone who has legal standing can issue a claim that the estate is not being properly administered; if they prove that it is being administered on the basis of a forged will, it seems likely that they will win. In ...


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