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The standard depends upon the way that the challenge is framed procedurally. For example, State of Kansas v. Ryan Robert Johnson, 450 P.3d 790 (Kan. 2019) treats this as a question of fact with respect to a sufficiency of the evidence argument on appeal, but analyzes a facial attack on one of the alternative grounds upon which criminal sanctions may be ...


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No jurisdiction imposes penalties for "mispronunciation", however conceived. Some jurisdictions have official language academies which sanctioned by the government, but they are limited to a declaration of what is "official". Some countries have naming laws, according to which in Norway you shall not name your child Zaphod Beeblebrox, but ...


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In the US the first amendment protections given to free expression make defamation claims significantly harder to pursue than in some other countries. o-called 'product defamation" claims are generally harder yet. In the case of Dominion Voting Systems some of those sued seem to have made fairly specific allegations, which, if true, would involve ...


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What is considered a seal in this context? The statue in question states "Whoever fraudulently or wrongfully affixes or impresses the seal of any department or agency of the United States" The FDA has no seal per se, but the USDA does. I suspect that you could spend a lot of time arguing that under the statute you can use any logo you want for any ...


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A movie denying the Holocaust would generally be legal in the United States. Rosenberger v. Rectors and Visitors of the University of Virginia (1995) (“When the government targets not subject matter but particular views taken by speakers on a subject, the violation of the First Amendment is all the more blatant."). Although First Amendment protections ...


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Lying is protected in the United States You can make films (or write books etc.) denying the Holocaust, or stating that UFOs are alien spacecraft, or that one race/ethnicity/gender is smarter/stronger/better than another without fear of government sanction. Further, the Supreme Court has consistently ruled that hate speech is protected in the United States - ...


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