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3

Yes and No In the lower court (Amtsgericht), yes you can proceed without a lawyer, but for certain cases. In those cases and in the upper courts, you have to have a lawyer. That is called "Anwaltspflicht" or "Anwaltszwang". You need a lawyer whenever the case is in the layers of Landgericht, Oberlandesgericht, Oberstes Landesgericht, ...


12

The page owner might be breaking the law in three ways: She might unrightfully claim that certain businesses are breaking the law, punishable as defamation and under civil law. She might help others to break the law. She might instigate others to the illegal act of not wearing a mask. However, I see some similarities to the unpunished act of publishing ...


5

As a private person, you can report the behavior to the police and health authorities, but you can not sue them per se - it is up to the Police to investigate (which they have the duty of) and the Staatsanwalt to decide to instigate a lawsuit. The Staatsanwaltschaft also will know best if and which laws were broken by both the listed places and the hoster. ...


14

The COVID restrictions are new enough that there are few court decisions on how to interpret them. There are frequent requests for court injunctions seeking temporary relief. Some pass, some are denied. The website might accuse locations listed there of breaking the restrictions. Making such an accusation in public sounds like a very bad idea, especially if ...


0

Depending on the type of parcel, some types have been suspended from being handled at the door due to Coronavirus in different delivery services. Most notably "Nachnahme" is currently not done for DHL but is only for international DHL Express shipments. Any other such services are automatically sent to pickup points where one can pay. Similarly, ID ...


4

Can they have a clause in the fine print that in laymans terms just says 'we might just not fulfill our side of the deal'. That paraphrase appears to trivialize the actual terms of the contract (of which fine print you mention you don't know in detail). Germany's Bürgerliches Gesetzbuch (BGB) at §262 entitles the shipping company --insofar as obligor-- to a ...


6

Video surveillance is not necessarily illegal, but you do need a very solid legal basis. You should not install a camera in your lab without going through your department's usual processes, likely involving the data protection officer and the Betriebsrat/Personalrat which MUST sign off on such workplace surveillance measures. I don't quite see how a vote ...


3

Yes and No Germany has several criminal records. Technically, all convictions lead to a criminal record in that there is a record in the Federal Central Register. However, in common usage, a “criminal record” means a crime that appears on a Certificate of Good Conduct. Which crimes do appear is complicated but basically, if you only have one conviction and ...


5

What you claim isn’t true. You can’t usually get German citizenship if you have another citizenship. You can (possibly) get German citizenship if you tried to get rid of another citizenship and failed. You still have the other citizenship, you are not stateless. It’s just that Germany would make an exception for you and allow you to have two citizenships in ...


3

There are nations in the world that do not allow you to renounce citizenship That is a matter for those countries. However, whether another country considers you to be a citizen of any country is a matter for that country's domestic law. So, whether Germany considers you to be a Turkish citizen or not is a matter for Germany - not Turkey. That is not to say ...


4

The university has a legal obligation to collect certain data from attendees, including employees an visitors. It has decided to keep these records in digital form, and offers a smartphone app as a convenience. The university has outsourced the data processing activity to a third party. This is perfectly legal under the GDPR, if that third party is ...


1

You misinterpret §6: It states "Zum zweck X dürfen erboben werden" - "is allowed to take data for reason X". This does alter other law that otherwise would preclude taking these data. The more relevant sentence is the first one, which defines the reason X as data that is required by this ordinance. And the ordinance does in fact demand ...


1

It is not illegal for the mother to continue working there under the condition that she continues to uphold her professional confidentiality. It is not a violation of the employer to allow their employees, on a need to know bases, access to such data: § 203 (3) - Violation of private secrets (StGB) (3) A secret has not been revealed within the meaning of ...


1

I made the comment that this belongs into Expatriates Stack Exchange, but since there is a (heavily downvoted) answer in place I thought I'd add this as an answer, too. As a graduate from a German university, you can get a Aufenthaltserlaubnis zur Arbeitsplatzsuche für Fachkräfte (roughly translated jobseeker's visa for professionals). Germany gives work ...


1

If you pushed her back after she slapped you and it is not clear that a second slapping would occur (or she slapped you, because you pushed her) then it is not self-defence you (or she) did not prevent a present unlawful attack If it is clear that you are going to be slapped then pushing her away, in a reasonable manor, is self-defence you prevented a ...


2

I realize this is Law SE and not Expatriates SE or Travel SE, but it might be helpful for the OP and other readers to sort out the various steps of police involvement in Germany: Anybody can call the police if he or she thinks there is a crime or emergency. Germany has separate numbers for fire/ambulance (112) and the police (110). The police dispatcher who ...


5

can really anyone in Germany call the police on others without proof of anything? Anyone anywhere can call the police without proof of anything as long as they have a phone. The question is, what will the police do about it. Police in Germany are more professional and less corrupt than in many countries in the world (e.g. they are much less corrupt than ...


2

No, they can't. They are required by law to issue a Einzugsbestätigung when your indended stay is longer than 3 months when staying in a hostel or pension or another form of temporary accommodation. The rule for temporary residence (up to 3 months) have many exceptions Youth Hostel are exempted Hotels, Pensions have a simplified registration (Hotel ...


2

In Germany, a motor vehicle owner has strict liability without regard to fault for personal injuries caused by use of the owner's motor vehicle pursuant to Section 7 of the Road Traffic Act (also known as the "StVG"). This states (with some modifications from the translation linked to be more natural in English legalese): § 7 Liability of the ...


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