86

Even if you had grounds for a lawsuit, you could not make it come out of the officer’s pocket. Under Chapter 4.64 of the Seattle Code, the City of Seattle is generally required to defend and indemnify city employees who are sued for doing their job. If you sue a police officer, the city pays his lawyer; if you win or if the city decides your claim is ...


20

I'll go ahead and add in a federal level legal principle on top of all of the local and state laws that stand in your way: qualified immunity. In short, you'd have to prove that the officer was plainly incompetent. Police officers who have accidentally shot people they were intending to tase have been granted immunity under the various statutes being ...


16

You could sue the officer. You could even make it a federal suit under Section 1983 (see the text of the law). However, to prevail, you would have to show that the officer knew that you were doing nothing illegal, or that any reasonable officer would have known this. If a reasonable, even an ordinarily careless, officer might well have believed that you were ...


5

The ability to create such an office derives (according to Roosevelt, who invoked the power), from the constitutional authority of the president and the Trading with the Enemy Act amended by the War Powers Act, 1941. A president cannot repeal a part of The Constitution or an act of Congress, but he can undo an act by a president (as long as Congress hasn't ...


4

I will address only the legal issues. Prosecutors for very good public policy reasons are not required to prosecute every crime they have suspicions about. When exercising this discretion they consider: Is the act, in fact, criminal - many of the things you list, while reprehensible, unethical, and possibly immoral are not actually criminal. Do they have ...


4

No A lawyer is considered an "officer of the court" in the sense that certain duties to the court are imposed on the lawyer. That does not give the lawyer authority as if the lawyer was part of the court staff, nor a law enforcement officer. A statement can be prosecuted as perjury only if it is made under oath (or affirmation) in court, or if it is made "...


3

Most of the answers are being too specific, vicarious liability would apply to the officer just as it does with any other employer. The employer is responsible for the employees incompetence, not the employee. As for your philosophical objections to the officer not paying, that is in fact why vicarious liability is so common and applies in this case. ...


3

The biggest issue with your situation is that the police didn't get your $350. The towing company did. So even if you can get the police to admit they made a mistake, they don't have your money, and can't give it back. They will tell you to take it up with the towing company. The towing company isn't going to give you your money back, because towing ...


3

Defamation is a suit that can be brought by anyone, however, there are extra hurdles if the plaintiff is an official. Following New York Times Co v Sullivan, the plaintiff must prove actual malice: that the defendant knew the information was untrue or acted with reckless disregard for its truth.


2

Within the field of accounting, the process of maintaining financial records and auditing financial records for purposes other than tax collection is called "financial accounting" as distinct from "tax accounting" and as distinct from "managerial accounting" which is the internal use of financial information for the purposes of managing the entity and ...


2

There are laws in place in some states and cities that prevent a towing company from holding your vehicle hostage if you don't pay the tow fee. I know this doesn't help you right now, but I post as an answer to bring awareness to anyone else who may find themselves in a similar situation. In your case (assuming Seattle or Washington state has a similar law) ...


2

This interview with the man who served as the lead prosecutor on the Enron Task Force clarifies some of my questions. In essence, as one of the other answers mentioned, just because someone committed a careless/immoral/negligent act doesn't make it criminal according to the law. And establishing that there was actual malice and intent to deceive, which could ...


1

It is not illegal to lie to an individual, and it is illegal to lie in a 'matter'. The statutes are framed in terms of a circumstance such as being under oath of in an investigation. Fraud of course has separate rules.


1

Since no one more knowledgeable has posted an answer, here is my best attempt at an answer. I suggest that the OP, or other interested party, treat this as an initial overview rather than a final answer, and do some more research themselves. I hope that the provided links are helpful in that endeavor. Source: Tender Rules from the Indian Central Vigilance ...


1

It's possible that the emails in question fall under an exemption. There is, for example, an exemption for materials "relating to a specifically named individual, the disclosure of which may constitute an unwarranted invasion of personal privacy" and one for "inter-agency or intra-agency memoranda or letters relating to policy positions being developed by ...


1

The Office of Alien Property Custodian (APC) morphed into and became The Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC). The Treasury website as well as Wikipedia explain it. You can find OFAC here https://www.treasury.gov/about/organizational-structure/offices/Pages/Office-of-Foreign-Assets-Control.aspx Such an Office will always be necessary as long as the U....


1

We don't know because (I think) there hasn't been a case about it. However, my guess is that if you sent the encrypted version of the email in response to a FOIA request, most judges would not let you get away with it. Otherwise the government would just turn over encrypted documents in response to every FOIA request. The Department would have an ...


1

Yes you can do this. Here are the ways you can be sued/prosecuted: if you are a government employee or contractor this is a breach of the duty you owe your employer if you are a party to a NDA, this is a breach of contract if the emails contain official secrets, publishing them is a crime if the emails contain commercially sensitive information (e.g. about ...


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