New answers tagged

0

First of all, GPL requires you to provide your code upon request only to the people you have distributed GPL binaries to. Now does your code need to be GPL in the first place? In case you are using the MIT API of a GPL program, then your code likely doesn't have to be GPL but you shouldn't distribute the GPL parts together with your program as a bundle (...


0

When you created a program (from scratch), you are the author of that program, aka the copyright owner. Such ownership comes with certain rights, granted to you by the Copyright Law of your country. If any other person or organization wants to use your program, they must obtain a permit from you, which you usually give in the form of a license. Now, the text ...


12

In practice, it is abundantly clear to which entity the “Free Software Foundation” refers, even if the FSF were to change its name, even if there are unaffiliated organizations with the same name. Version 3 of the GPL also contains a link to the FSF website, making it clear which organization this referred to in 2007 when the license text was published. If ...


1

Preface This answer assumes that OP has a GPL'ed modified work he is distributing to his friends, and wants to avoid giving them his modifications to the source code. If by "uses another software" he means he simply executes their unmodified executable, then this answer would probably, depending on the exact details, be quite different (for example ...


1

You are using open source software in your project. You are allowed to do that because of the open source license. Most likely (for example for GPL licensed software) you are allowed to do the following: Create and use software that is derived from the open source software, without any obligation to you. Distribute your modified software IF you distribute ...


1

Not if you host it on a web server. If you host a program containing open source code on a web server, you don't need to abide by the terms of the open source licenses and distribute the source code to the people who access your server, because you're technically not considered as distributing the code. This is also known as the "SaaS (Software as a ...


6

For your case specifically, the API for that library is licensed under MIT, not GPL. MIT is non-viral, so as long as you only call into the API for that library, you do not need to make your code open-source.


28

It depends on exactly how you are "using" the GPL code. If you have copied and modified the source code then you can only distribute copies under the GPL. If you have invoked a GPL program as a separate process so that your code can use its output then you can distribute your program without the source code, as long as you comply with the terms of ...


13

What you have been told is incorrect. You are in no way required to release your product under an open source license, nor to publish it in any form. If you do "convey" a work that is under the GPL, or a modified version of a work under the GPL, then you must provide the source code, and include the GPL license text, and for a modified version, ...


45

You need to know two things about the GPL: The GPL is a license which requires that when you distribute binaries, you distribute the source code with them (binaries being the things you can directly run) The GPL is viral - any project using something licensed under the GPL must also be licensed under the GPL The easiest way to comply with the first point ...


1

Both the MIT and BSD 3 clause license can be included with both more permissive and less permissive licenses, so long as you adhere to the requirements the licenses lay out. In both cases, these licenses require that the original copyright notice be included in any distributed codebase, as you have noted in the question. This does not mean, however, that the ...


Top 50 recent answers are included