42

There are legitimate apps that let you buy phone numbers. With the right app I can buy let's say a landline number in Kansas. I call you, and you will think it's some guy in Kansas calling you. That's totally legal, it's a genuine phone number, and just like I can buy 10 phones and have ten phone numbers, I can use an app to pretend to have 10 phones. I ...


20

Actually, he has been libelling you which is defamation in writing - slander is verbal defamation. Notwithstanding, if what he has done has or is likely to cause damage to your reputation and is a statement of fact that is not true then it is actionable. Neither name calling nor his opinion that you "are the worst person in the world" are statements of ...


9

Education in India falls under the concurrent list -- i.e. both state and union laws apply. However, there do not appear to be any codified "student rights". The relevant national body for "technical education" is the AICTE, which does have a mechanism for grievance redressal, this is often used as the primary source of complaints against ragging. You can ...


9

Yes. But you might not want to. The general rule of thumb is: anyone can sue anyone else, at any time for any thing. However, I believe in this case you would need to show actual damages. I don't think emotional distress qualifies as actual damages. That type of thing is usually awarded as an add-on to something like a personal injury case; it's usually ...


7

I will assume B.C. as your specific jurisdiction: there could be provincial differences. As phoog says, you certainly may mention this problem to management, who have an interest in keeping you happy. No law against that. As for the "legality" of sexual harassment, the CBA BC branch says that "Sexual harassment, which is discrimination based on sex, is ...


6

Overview The cop is basically wrong. Sexual harassment is not the only kind of harassment recognized by U.S. law. The question and the cop's answer to it, assume that simply asking certain questions is illegal or not illegal, but it isn't that straight forward. Words communicated verbally are part of the analysis, but not the entire analysis. It all ...


5

Defamation that is actionable in court in the United States consists of a false statement about a presently existing fact that damages your reputation and is not a matter of opinion. While not strictly required in a case involving private parties that is not a matter of public concern, most defamation cases require proof that the false statement was made ...


5

Law enforcement only investigates crimes, and they have significant discretion regarding which crimes to investigate. If they considered a crime to have occurred in your case, they could certainly seek a court warrant requiring Google to turn over IP addresses. More likely, you might have standing to seek relief in civil courts. In such a case, you could ...


4

Who is going to read this nonsense? That is the question. If your former landlord is just posting this nonsense on your personal timeline, it’s irritating but honestly not “slander.” But if—for example—you have a local community group/page on Facebook and the claims of you damaging things were posted there you might have a case; how much you want to pursue ...


4

In the United States, I would strongly expect that an accurate depiction of historical fact (even if uncomfortably graphic) would be protected under the First Ammendment. Otherwise, the government could functionally censor the worst parts of history (as being too awful to discuss or depict), which is exactly the kind of thing the First Amendment is designed ...


4

Possibly but probably not. Sexual harassment is bullying or coercion of a sexual nature, or the unwelcome or inappropriate promise of rewards in exchange for sexual favors. If the word "babe" was used as a direct substitute for the word "Miss" without any sexual connotation then it is not sexual harassment. It was inappropriate and unprofessional and ...


4

It seems like callous behavior which leads to a foreseeable death deserves a bigger punishment than just firing of the administrator. The starting point of the analysis is that no one is legally responsible, civilly or criminally, for a suicide unless that person intended that the person who committed suicide do so, which is almost certainly not true in ...


4

"Nexus" means "connection". A "causal nexus" in this context is a connection that causes harassment at work. There isn't any bright line dividing behavior on personal term that does or does not meet this test. The law does't work that way. Instead, there is a fairly vague test (in legal theory this is called a "standard" as opposed to a "rule") and there ...


3

You don't say who is telling you that you need to do these things, and it does matter. Educational institutions are required to maintain a discrimination-free environment, so if a student makes inappropriate remarks to another student, they have to address the matter (if they ignore it, saying "Boys will be boys", they can get sued). They will have ...


3

For there to be criminal prosecution (the end point of a criminal investigation), there has to be a violation of a criminal statute. Title IX does not contain any such provisions. It is incorrect that an "institution which accepts large payments under the guise of following a certain policy and then does not follow the said policy" commits fraud. The Texas ...


3

You Have No Recourse You have no recourse, at least to the extent that the people communicating to your employer point out the particular Facebook posts that were made or accurately summarize or paraphrase them (if the content of the Facebook posts was misrepresented to the employer that would be a different story). A factually truthful statement (e.g., "...


3

It would seem that any institution which accepts large payments under the guise of following a certain policy and then does not follow the said policy is, at the very least, committing fraud. Nope. If I accept a lot of money from you to deliver you a product and then do not deliver the product, that's normally just civil breach of contract. Fraud involves ...


3

At common law, a tenant is entitled to "quiet enjoyment" of the property. This means that the owner can only interact with the tenant as spelled out in the lease or in an emergency situation. First, calmly and quietly write down a list of your grievances. Then check your lease to see what the landlord is entitled to do. Cross off any grievances that are ...


3

It appears to be a grey area and does not appear to have an explicit definition aside from religion in many jurisdictions. Even those jurisdictions that discuss a broader definition, seem to shy away from actually doing so. Note that this is only a cursory search and experts in various jurisdictions may come up with more detailed results. This case seems to ...


3

FL 810.145 (c) - "Place and time when a person has a reasonable expectation of privacy" In Florida, there is no expectation of privacy in public. You can legally record both audio and visual anything you can see in public. As for the harassment, set up security cams and record as much of it as possible in order to provide the Police with evidence of any ...


3

Most hate speech, such as "Jews are bad," "Muslims are bad, "Catholics are bad," ad nauseum, doesn't target specific individuals. Harassment does. You can burn a Koran, but you can't stalk or threaten someone. Once you cross the line from the general to the specific, it becomes a crime.


3

If a newspaper publishes an article that is actually defamatory (i.e. publishes false statements that cause you quantifiable harm), and you successfully sue the publisher, you might get a court order requiring them to retract the statements or remove them from their web page. An archive like newspapers.com isn't making false statements, it is making true ...


3

Yes, you can, and I believe you'd have some degree of traction. The argument is that the app is giving him a variety of phone numbers to use, and legitimate uses of such an ability are few and far between. Most uses of a phone number changer are "mischief of one kind or another", and the developer knew that, or reasonably should have known that. ...


3

The other answers are correct that you should speak to a lawyer, but you should expect your lawyer to tell you that you don't have a viable lawsuit. I can't speak to Pennsylvania law, but these facts would make a pretty weak claim for sexual harassment under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act. To win a hostile-work environment case, you must demonstrate: ...


2

Taking Washington law to be typical, harassment in the relevant sense is covered in RCW 9a.46.020. First, to "harass", you must "threaten", specifically, (i) To cause bodily injury immediately or in the future to the person threatened or to any other person; or (ii) To cause physical damage to the property of a person other than the actor; or ...


2

Just because someone is posting mean and impolite things about you doesn't make it defamation. You must prove what the person is saying is a lie, they know it's a lie, they intended to cause you harm and you suffered actual physical and/or financial damage. The damage piece is usually the hardest part to prove. If you lost your job because of the posting ...


2

This is likely a simple case of someone giving them your email address by mistake, instead of their own. In any case, if you didn't make the booking you owe them nothing. You should respond to the email, stating that you didn't make the booking and that you believe they have a case of mistaken identity. Suggest that they send the SMS message, as it is ...


2

From https://oag.ca.gov/consumers/general/collection_agencies10: If you are not the person the debt collector is looking for – for example, if your name is the same as the person who owes the bill – explain the mistake in writing as soon as possible. You may be asked to provide a drivers’ license or other proof of identification to show that you are wrong ...


2

Can a victim go to police? N.B. Bullying means making fun of, mocking on a regular basis. N.B. Suppose, some specific class-mates/colleagues make fun of me in the class, in any public place on a regular basis. Probably not. And very likely, not via the police or even a temporary restraining order. If there is a remedy it would mostly likely be ...


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