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No. You are not required to undergo a medical procedure even if it Is guaranteed to save a life. Although I hear some places force vaccination based on inconclusive evidence from pharmaceutical corporations to potentially, contribute, in sum, to the saving of a few lives. This is stacked with laws that make it illegal to sue the corporation if and when the ...


-1

In the United Kingdom - there are moral and legal reasons to provide translators to patients (a UK NHS policy is here) Another policy makes mention of the Equality Act: The provision of interpreter and translations services enables us to ensure equality of access to health services. As part of the General Duty of the Equality Act 2010, public sector ...


2

This would be a question of fact for a jury, informed by expert testimony, to evaluate. There is no one correct answer and it is a mixed question of law and fact. The jury is given a very broad legal standard and has to apply it to the facts. The jury is not told how other cases with similar facts have been resolved by previous juries and the judge and ...


3

Maybe, but probably not, although this would be a question of fact to resolve on a case by case basis under broad legal standards by a jury, and would also depend upon the state where it took place, and upon the nature of the employer of the paramedic. The hypothetical facts in this case are rich enough and ambiguous enough that the case could go either way ...


1

If they are alive and appear competent at the moment the EMT arrives, the patient has near absolute right to refuse treatment. If they do so, the responder has to back off and stop treatment. Only in life threatening situations treatment can be forced upon a conscious and seemingly competent patient. I mean treatment in a situation where you are skewered by ...


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Now, technically, medical licensing laws might justify circumcision. However, there is not an actual law that defines surgery as not assault. Simply the fact that the government licensed you to perform surgery doesnt say whether any particular surgery is assault. So the circumciser may have a defense, but it's a weak one, and there is no actual law ...


1

The pertinent rule, implementing §1557 of the ACA, requires notices of nondiscrimination, which the government has made available in 64 languages, which says this or the equivalent in other languages. Assuming that the person understands one of those languages then they will know (if they can read) that they can contact the civil rights coordinator; and if ...


3

Hospitals in the US that receive federal funding (e.g., Medicare, Medicade, FCHIP, etc.) are required to provide language services under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 52 U.S.C. §2000d et seq to those persons of limited English proficiency who receive services. This US Government Department of Health & Human Services page notes: Persons with ...


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