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3

Now, because of Brexit, I have been told that in order to stay I need to apply for settled status. Isn’t this discrimination since nationals do not have to apply? Yes, requiring you to apply for settled status is discrimination. It is well established that a country may discriminate against foreigners by imposing conditions on their presence in its ...


6

I want to answer one part missed so far: Isn’t the UK Government breaking the law? Currently, if the UK Government would be requiring this from you, they would break the law. Laws made by the EU. After the Brexit, the UK isn't part of the EU anymore. EU law doesn't concern them. The only law they could break is the law of the UK. And because the law of ...


5

discrimination is in general legal unless it is based on some characteristic which is specifically forbidden as a basis for discrimination (e.g. race) sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinions, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status Your assumption is that you are ...


-3

The short answer is yes, at the moment. Take for example the situation you describe where you were deported and forced to abandon your children (who are presumably British). Under current British law, which includes the Human Rights Act, you would likely have a very strong case to make on the right to family life. The problem is that as soon as the UK is ...


4

Human rights are red herring here. Your human right is to stay in your own country, not in a country of your choosing (in this case UK). You're requesting a privilege beyond human rights. All other rights and privileges are given to citizens by the state. A non-citizen has no such rights by default. UK had chosen to grant you some rights by the means of ...


3

Would there a breach of my human rights if I was not to apply for settle status and then subsequentially got deported (taken away from my children, home, business, etc.)? How about if I was refused, re-entry or access to public services (NHS for example)? To answer only this part of the question, the answer is potentially yes. It's not unusual for ...


14

I need to apply for settled status. Isn’t this discrimination since nationals do not have to apply? Yes it is. Isn’t the UK Government breaking the law? No, discrimination is only illegal when it applies to specified classes (race, sex etc.) is specified situations (employment, access etc.). It is not illegal for immigration to discriminate against ...


56

Isn’t this discrimination since nationals do not have to apply? Yes it is discrimination. But that does not make it illegal. In fact discrimination is in general legal unless it is based on some characteristic which is specifically forbidden as a basis for discrimination (e.g. race). And in general, all of the countries in the world allow and enforce ...


5

A business can arbitrarily refuse service to anyone whatsoever, unless there is a specific statutory prohibition. In the US, race cannot be the basis for distinguishing how or who you serve as a business, anywhere. There are other protected categories such as age, sex, sexual orientation, marital or other family status, veteran status, religion and so on, ...


4

Yes, they're able to discriminate as long as its not illegal discrimination; and there's currently no law protecting people with these views. Both at a physical or digital store, they can be refused service and told to leave.


1

Could the freedom to choose an Operating System be a legally enforceable basic human right? No, meaning that accommodating the alleged needs that would benefit --at most-- a very narrow sector of the population is not worth enacting the fundamental amendments (possibly a cascade thereof) that this would entail. I will focus on US law since you did not ...


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