88

It is legal, at least in the US, for a store (or other entity) to refuse to sell any item to any individual for any non-prohibited reason (prohibited reasons are typically things like race or religion). More over, in various US jurisdictions, it is prohibited to "furnish" alcohol to a "minor" (for example, under California's ABC law), which can be ...


45

You go into a store, pick up an item, go to the counter and you think you are legally entitled to own the item provided that you pay for it? Wrong. Wrong for any item, not just alcohol. Items that are on the shelves in stores are not offers in terms of contract law. They are invitations to treat/bargain. When you take an item to the counter it is you who ...


33

There are a couple of indications that a bouncer may not confiscate an ID. This policy document adopting licensing policies to Require licensees with fake ID violations to temporarily or permanently hire on-site law enforcement or certified security guards who are properly trained to check IDs during regular or peak hours to deter the use of fake ...


22

ServSafe actually has a compiled list of documents which identify a lot of information about the various aspects of alcohol sales within each state. I've separated them into three categories based on whether the state allows, disallows, or does not regulate it one way or the other. Of course, keep in mind that these are state laws and laws may be even more ...


21

The answers here are already correct, but wanted to make a quick comment over this Even when I left the store to wait in the car they made him check out at a different register. It is of course completely silly that this is required, but from what I was told when I worked at a liquor store this was needed. The idea is by checking out at a different ...


17

Yes. A domestic passport is sufficient photo ID for any purpose (other than driving or establishing state residency) and is expressly authorized as sufficient ID for employment on a form I-9 and for banking "know your customer" rules. Indeed, for some purposes, even an expired passport is sufficient ID as it establishes citizenship.


15

Identification rules vary from state to state, but there is no state which would require a person in Mr. Walker's position to identify themselves to law enforcement. The passenger is compelled to produce identification to law enforcement through the threat of illegal violence.


6

A few complications since this is a passport: The passport is the property of the issuing sovereign Nation. Typically the laws of the locality require the non-citizen be in possession of the passport. The person should get his own embassy involved since it's their document. The local police should also be pulled in if they are not corrupt- the embassy ...


5

What are the legal ramifications if one was really Satoshi, denied it publicly, but then later proved to really be him? In general, the person's false denial is irrelevant for legal purposes. One would have to add very special circumstances for the person's misrepresentation to have any legal ramifications. Those additional circumstances would have to be ...


5

health care checks. Hotel check in. Employment? maybe. Background Checks? doesn't matter. It actually does matter, because there is sometimes a law governing the documents that may be shown for a given purpose. For example, the I-9 form, for verifying someone's eligibility to accept employment in the US, has a well defined lists of documents that an ...


4

Regarding being pulled over, the guidance at Learn to drive a car: step by step states (emphasis mine): If a police officer asks you to, you must be able to show: your driving licence a valid insurance certificate a valid MOT certificate (if your vehicle needs one) If you don’t have the documents with you at the time, you may be asked to take them to a ...


4

It depends on what you are using it for. AFAIK, there is no law specifying that a passport must be valid for every single potential requirement of photo ID. For example, until 2010, you could not use a passport for purchasing alcohol in California, because it does not have a physical description.


3

The PDF you linked also lists "REAL ID Driver’s License/ID Card" as an acceptable document in Group B. So, it seems that an out-of-state driver's license may be used to verify DOB, but only if it complies with the REAL ID requirements. Apparently, all 50 states are now issuing REAL IDs, but only 38% of all licenses nationwide are currently REAL ID ...


3

It depends on the device identifier. For example, if you distribute your application through Apple's App Store, there is no way for you to get any identifier for the device. You can get an identifier that is unique for the combination of the device + your application, so you can verify that the same user doesn't use the application on four devices. But if ...


3

New York has a "stop and identify" law which says that a police officer may stop a person in a public place located within the geographical area of such officer's employment when he reasonably suspects that such person is committing, has committed or is about to commit either (a) a felony or (b) a misdemeanor defined in the penal law, and may ...


3

When you make a request based on the GDPR, Art. 12(6) GDPR applies. Without prejudice to Article 11, where the controller has reasonable doubts concerning the identity of the natural person making the request referred to in Articles 15 to 21, the controller may request the provision of additional information necessary to confirm the identity of the ...


3

To add to StephanS's answer, "may be asked to take them to a police station within 7 days" is somewhat at the discretion of the police officer. If you can't produce them immediately and the police officer can't verify your licence/insurance status electronically then you are likely to be treated as driving without them. That includes immediate seizure of ...


2

The general rule Birth certificates, social security cards, and driver's licenses identify a person, but what happens if these are all lost? Say a homeless person loses all of their documents in the shuffle, what could they do to recover them? Even further, if this person has no family or work colleagues who will vouch for them, is it possible that their ...


2

On some pages in LinkedIn's help center (1, 2, 3), they mentioned about China's regulations regarding real name identity verification. Searching about real name identity verification linkedin returned articles from late April 2018 on technode, LinkedIn has begun to inform Chinese users that they need add their phone numbers for real-name registration. The ...


2

For what it is worth, there is case law in Colorado holding that for purposes including real estate title, that your middle name(s) do not count as part of your legal name. But, I do not believe that this rule is universal or widespread.


2

The police can identify the legal keeper of the car which legally carries that license plate. I assume you are interested in the identity of the driver; if you have the identity of the legal owner then the legal owner very often can identify the driver - especially important if the car is a rental car; the rental car will known who was in posession of the ...


2

I'm not aware of any EU/EEA jurisdictions that require IP addresses to be logged by website operators as a matter of course - in other words a blanket requirement. There might be circumstances when the authorities oblige a website operator to make and hand over such logs. If there were such an obligation you would have the "legal obligation" lawful basis for ...


1

Unknowingly, it's not punishable. Knowingly, it's a crime. Fact is, the ID isn't even the property of the person it is issued to, it is property of the state issuing it, given to the person to identify themselves to the authorities. The employer and any person finding an ID is usually obligated to turn it over to the authorities. Merely having it in their ...


1

Do I have to log IP addresses for possible criminal investigations? Do I have to be compliant in terms of GDPR for the subject of IP logging (as IP considerable to be an "online identifier", a GDPR term)? Generally speaking, no, although you did not specify the type of online service at issue. To the extent that "[n]atural persons may be associated with ...


1

It's not just legal, but often (depending on the state/county) legally required, otherwise they would be considered 'negligent' in helping providing a minor with alcohol, which can get them in jail.


1

To add to Tom Revells and Owains answers from the point of view of purchasing age-restricted products a photocopy or digital would not be acceptable. The only IDs that shop workers can accept are Driving Licence Photocards, Passports or Proof Of Age Cards with a PASS hologram on it. All of these feature various anti-forgery measures such as the hologram ...


1

If you were a resident of the country where the name change was done, I would expect that name change would be recognized in the US. It's just a matter of having an appropriate document from that country, possibly with a notarized translation, to show to agencies in the US to get them to change their record of your name. If you didn't take pains to get ...


1

This answer will different from country to country - however what is looked for is generally government / state issued ID (or a government recognised substitute). Passports must be close to a gold standard for 1 form of ID because they are government issued and need to meet certain internationally agreed criteria to be useable. Another common solution is ...


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