88

It is legal, at least in the US, for a store (or other entity) to refuse to sell any item to any individual for any non-prohibited reason (prohibited reasons are typically things like race or religion). More over, in various US jurisdictions, it is prohibited to "furnish" alcohol to a "minor" (for example, under California's ABC law), which can be ...


45

You go into a store, pick up an item, go to the counter and you think you are legally entitled to own the item provided that you pay for it? Wrong. Wrong for any item, not just alcohol. Items that are on the shelves in stores are not offers in terms of contract law. They are invitations to treat/bargain. When you take an item to the counter it is you who ...


21

The answers here are already correct, but wanted to make a quick comment over this Even when I left the store to wait in the car they made him check out at a different register. It is of course completely silly that this is required, but from what I was told when I worked at a liquor store this was needed. The idea is by checking out at a different ...


5

What are the legal ramifications if one was really Satoshi, denied it publicly, but then later proved to really be him? In general, the person's false denial is irrelevant for legal purposes. One would have to add very special circumstances for the person's misrepresentation to have any legal ramifications. Those additional circumstances would have to be ...


3

It depends on the device identifier. For example, if you distribute your application through Apple's App Store, there is no way for you to get any identifier for the device. You can get an identifier that is unique for the combination of the device + your application, so you can verify that the same user doesn't use the application on four devices. But if ...


3

New York has a "stop and identify" law which says that a police officer may stop a person in a public place located within the geographical area of such officer's employment when he reasonably suspects that such person is committing, has committed or is about to commit either (a) a felony or (b) a misdemeanor defined in the penal law, and may ...


3

When you make a request based on the GDPR, Art. 12(6) GDPR applies. Without prejudice to Article 11, where the controller has reasonable doubts concerning the identity of the natural person making the request referred to in Articles 15 to 21, the controller may request the provision of additional information necessary to confirm the identity of the ...


2

The police can identify the legal keeper of the car which legally carries that license plate. I assume you are interested in the identity of the driver; if you have the identity of the legal owner then the legal owner very often can identify the driver - especially important if the car is a rental car; the rental car will known who was in posession of the ...


2

I'm not aware of any EU/EEA jurisdictions that require IP addresses to be logged by website operators as a matter of course - in other words a blanket requirement. There might be circumstances when the authorities oblige a website operator to make and hand over such logs. If there were such an obligation you would have the "legal obligation" lawful basis for ...


1

Do I have to log IP addresses for possible criminal investigations? Do I have to be compliant in terms of GDPR for the subject of IP logging (as IP considerable to be an "online identifier", a GDPR term)? Generally speaking, no, although you did not specify the type of online service at issue. To the extent that "[n]atural persons may be associated with ...


1

It's not just legal, but often (depending on the state/county) legally required, otherwise they would be considered 'negligent' in helping providing a minor with alcohol, which can get them in jail.


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