40

I think the officer is probably lying, not just mistaken, but they are not required to always be truthful. In addition to the law against possessing ID with intent to commit, or to aid or abet, any crime, it is also against the law to be knowingly in possession of a stolen credit card, or any other property. An example of a strict-liability possession crime, ...


31

Looking at Washington's Identity Theft statute RCW 9.35.020 No person may knowingly obtain, possess, use, or transfer a means of identification or financial information of another person, living or dead, with the intent to commit, or to aid or abet, any crime. So, just possessing someone else's credit card is not a crime as long as one does not have the ...


5

Chances are almost exactly zero that this is a legitimate call. However, if you would like to verify that with the Department of the Treasury, they have a fraud hotline at 1-800-359-3898, which you can find on their contact us page. Assume any information they give you is false, and only contact the Department of the Treasury (or any other agency/company) ...


4

A US passport does not list height or make claims about ethnicity: what you have is a birth date and state, and photograph. A passport is taken to be strong proof of identity. You may apply for a new passport (turning in the old one), with a new photo. It may be necessary to provide "documentary evidence of identity" by appearing with an identifying witness (...


3

This is weird. Within the EU, a passport is proof of identity, and it is also proof that you are allowed to take a job in the EU. There is nothing that a birth certificate would add to this. Either the bar manager is badly misinformed, or he doesn't want to give your brother a job, and will come up with something even more ridiculouse if he provides his ...


3

Note that it's pretty obviously not illegal to simply possess another person's ID--it's not exactly an unusual situation with couples. I have handed plenty (probably upwards of 100) of government officials my wife's passport, nobody has ever had a problem with that.


3

is there any evidence they could prepare in advance that would secure their identity? Have a DNA test taken under circumstances when the identity of the person who is taking the test cannot be reasonably questioned (e.g. under forensic DNA lab protocols and with presentation of a passport with your pre-transformation photo). If your identity is doubted ...


3

Can millions of these individuals be indicted? Yes, they can indicted. Anyone (as an individual or a group who conspires) who commits a crime can be indicted. (But, it's a fantasy to think that millions would be indicted as part of a conspiracy.) The reason many people are not indicted for crimes is because they are not caught by law enforcement (LE) or ...


2

A courier could open the envelope and steal the ID information inside. Whether this is likely depends on how carefully the company is in selecting couriers, and what action the company, and local law enforcement would take if such a thing were reported. There is no way to know that in general, and it might vary for different companies. I have known of US ...


2

At common law, which may no longer be the law in England, your name is what you and others use to refer to yourself. So, even if person A was Christened "John Jacob Smith" at birth, while person B was Christened "James Bond" at birth, if person A lived his life as described using the name "James Bond", then "James Bond" would legally be one of Person A's ...


1

At the very least the girlfriend is in violation of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act because she has accessed a computer without authorization and thereby obtained a financial record.


1

Well, you’re already breaching their terms of service and committing fraud so you might as well add breaching personality rights and possibly copyright violation. Hope the jails are nice where you live.


1

There is almost certainly not a uniform international rule of law on this question. Burden of proof is an issue of civil procedure and not all countries place the same burden of proof on the same person for every single issue. The applicable law would also depend upon how the issue presented itself. In a criminal case, the law of the country where the ...


1

It would appear not legal to sign up for a PayPal account while not using your real name, reading the TOS at PayPal: Prohibited Activities You may not use the PayPal service for activities that: 1. violate any law, statute, ordinance or regulation. Signing up for a banking service using a fake name is fraud just about anywhere. If you did sign up ...


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