4

I think it is not possible to answer the question as is, but this document from the Indian courts lays out the relevant legal variables. A major split is between Sharers and Residuaries: a Sharers are all related by blood. A secondary split relates to testate vs. intestate succession (was there a will?). There are also special rules for West Bengal, Chennai ...


3

Not for that reason This would not make the Act invalid. The interaction between the two laws would simply mean that criminal prosecution would only succeed for acts on or after the Act came into effect. So, even though the law purports to invoke criminal sanction for acts before it came into effect, the Constitution says it can’t so it doesn’t. That doesn’...


3

Usually this answer would be provided by a local government land use ordinance, and not by the constitution, national law, state law or common law caselaw rules. It would vary considerably from place to place within India. You would need to review your local land use ordinances to find the answer.


3

To "punish" A there must be evidence that would convince the court beyond reasonable doubt. The last statement will be just a piece of admissible evidence. Just by itself it will certainly not be enough to prove A's guilt, but it may add weight if there are other corroborating pieces of evidence e.g. witnesses saying that X indeed killed themselves ...


2

The constitution of India doesn't explicitly talk about the freedom to enter India, it does however grant freedom of movement inside India with some reasonable restrictions (it is ironically not clearly defined as to what may be reasonable). Now it may be argued that for someone to be able to exercise their rights to this freedom, they must be allowed to ...


2

Art. 25 of the Indian Constitution says (in part) Subject to public order, morality and health and to the other provisions of this Part, all persons are equally entitled to freedom of conscience and the right freely to profess, practice and propagate religion. But, Nothing in this article shall affect the operation of any existing law or prevent the State ...


2

The scholars may be correct. The husband died first, so his widow and daughter inherit their % share from his estate. The father-in-law then died, and unless she is a beneficiary in his wasiyat, the widow is not one of his heirs so she is not eligible to inherit.


2

A power of attorney (POA) is a legal document giving one person (the agent or attorney-in-fact) the power to act for another person (the principal). The agent can have the broad legal authority or limited authority to make legal decisions about the principal's property, finances or medical care. The power of attorney is frequently used in the event of a ...


2

Independent Thought vs Union Of India (2017) apparently states the law of India, presently, and the answer is, 18. India being a common law country, the Supreme Court has the power to interpret the law when the statutory language might suggest something else. The issue is that marital intercourse is often an exception to rape laws (India does not recognize ...


2

Section 3(a) of the Uttar Pradesh Unauthorised Lottery (Prevention) Act of 1995 states that.. No personal shall promote or conduct any lottery... No distinction is made in the Act between physical and on-line lotteries, but whether this law is actually enforceable for using non-jurisdictional websites will depend on the circumstances and available evidence ...


1

Since there is no such law, it is difficult to prove the non-existence of a law. Indian law derives from UK law, with additions. There is no such law in the UK. There is a specific Indian law about registration of births and deaths, which simply includes a provision that the child's name is to be registered. There is no specific statutory provision against ...


1

Yes. Why? because Torture is triggering different crimes by harming the body or psyche of the victim. Torture is defined for example in the Rome statute of the ICC: "Torture" means the intentional infliction of severe pain or suffering, whether physical or mental, upon a person in the custody or under the control of the accused; except that ...


1

This is almost assuredly in violation of your non-compete (assuming that is what you mean). Company documents would be covered under a non-disclosure agreement, so it doesn't matter if you generated them yourself or shared company documents. The key part of a non-compete is that you agree not to engage in work that is similar to the work/business of the ...


1

The Internet Archive (IA) routinely takes snapshots of websites, indeed of much of the content on the web. Their service can be used to demonstrate the content of the site on the date of any such snapshot. They also have a procedure by which anyone can request a snapshot of any web page at any time. Although they do not guarantee to comply with such requests,...


1

No, but ... Courts have to interpret the statute and they do so according to a number of paradigms: The literal rule: the words of the statute should be read literally even if this leads to a contradiction or injustice. The mischief rule: the statute should be read so that it addresses the mischief that the legislature was trying to deal with. This would ...


1

In general, a person can bequeath their assets to whoever they want. Many jurisdictions impose a duty to make allowance for the maintenance of the testator's spouse and any dependents (usually children but could be other people). A will that doesn't do that can often be successfully challenged so that such an allowance is made. This would include the ...


1

While a person is resident in Australia, and has been for at least the past 12 months, that person can obtain a divorce under Australian law, without regard to Indian law. Whether India will recognize that divorce I do not know. If the person is not an Australian citizen and has not been resident in Australia for at least 12 months, the Australian courts ...


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