New answers tagged

14

Is there anything legally non-monopolistic about the CEA clause quoted above? Yes. The clause is not monopolistic at all, since it is not prohibiting you to purchase or retain policies from elsewhere. All it does is notify you about a limitation of CEA's liability to you in the event of losses covered by multiple insurance policies. Note that the clause is ...


13

Insurance is not gambling Insurance covers your loss. Insuring with multiple insurers does not entitle you to make a profit. This has been a fundamental part of general insurance law from the beginning, when there are co-insurers (including the owner if they underinsured) they share liability up to the amount of the loss. This provision in the contract is ...


3

It would depend on the law of that state, and the insurance policy. Here is a sample policy from the California Earthquake Authority. §8 on Other Insurance says a. If there is other insurance that covers earthquake loss to the dwelling or other property covered under this policy,we will pay our share of the covered loss or damage. Our share is the ...


2

Employees must follow the lawful and reasonable directions of their employer The CEO is an employee. Their employer is the school which, I assume, is some sort of body corporate since it has directors. The school must act through its agents, in this case the directors. So, if the directors instruct the CEO to do something lawful and reasonable, then the ...


1

The general rule is "no". In other words, the stepchildren have no right to life insurance proceeds on the death of their mother that are paid to her husband per her beneficiary designation. Two exceptions are listed in the other answers listed as #1 and #2 below, and there are at least eight other exceptions. All of these exceptions are narrow and ...


2

There is a federal law, the Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act which legally compels an emergency room (provided that they accept Medicare payments) to provide a medical screening examination and stabilize the patient. This is outside the scope of your concern. Otherwise, doctors have the same right to refuse to serve a customer that anyone ...


0

California law They are considered "service contracts" wherein they are subject to the Song-Beverly Consumer Warranty Act nor they are subject to the Insurance Code of California. California Civil Code §1791(o) “Service contract” which "means a contract in writing to perform, over a fixed period of time or for a specified duration, services ...


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