4

The copyright holder has the rights in whatever he created. If you have created something new based on his idea, the law will generally not be interested; but if your expression is recognisably a copy with a few changes, he can prevent publication or demand royalties. If you are uncertain which side of the line you fall, you should ask a lawyer (or, more ...


3

Because the IP was liscnesed to a company to allow people to put it on their shirts as part of a hobby. It did not liscens anyone to sell shirts with those prints already applied on them, least of all a third party. That is, Disney liscensed a company to sell prints for sewing on shirts, not shirts. When you moved into the shirt market, you are competeing ...


3

Do you have permission of the person? In general, product names fall under trademark law, not copyright. And while it's possible to use the name of a non-employee as a trademark, doing so without the permission of that person is rather dangerous. That person may sue you for a number of different reasons, with different demands - chiefly financial ...


2

It really depends how the tag line is presented. For example, "BigCo" may be an unregistrered (TM) or a Registered Trademark (R), but "big co" is not a registered mark. So if NewCo could have an actor say your tag line in all spoken advertisements and then when served a trademark dispute claim "You thought we said 'BigCo? We said 'big co'." In print ...


2

Many products and organizations are named using initials, often the initials of an owner or founder, or of a former business name. I recently hired an exterminator which game its name simply as "RPC" but their literature indicated this stood for 'Ron's Pest Control". The company IBM was once International Business machines, and 3M was once Minnesota Mining ...


1

You can keep the idea confidential until you have enough money to file a patent. People with no previous background who write and file their own patents do not often end up with the protection they desired but it is possible for you to make a serious study of patent law and patent office procedures. I recommend David Pressman's Patent It Yourself. It is not ...


1

It depends what you mean by "prevent anyone from registering it". Someone else could not validly claim copyright in a logo you create (assuming that it is complex and original enough to be protected by copyright, not all logos are). Publication, such as on GitHub, would be evidence that you had created it, or at least claimed to have done so, on a particular ...


1

Patents: yes. Registered designs: yes. Copyright: no. Registered Trademarks: yes. Common law Trademarks: no.


1

It is still "breaking the law". Any unauthorized copying is a violation of copyright law. It is presumably also a breach of contract. The copyright restriction is not limited to "and then using or sharing". Nor are sanctions resulting from breach of contract limited by the fact that you did not "use or share". The "did not use or share" consideration would ...


1

English law answer: That is a pretty badly drafted clause, at least with respect to how it would be viewed in an English court. Perhaps the clause is part of a larger section which sets out the scope of all clauses as relating to the employee's employment? The word "term" means that any intellectual property the person has created shall vest into the ...


1

Terms and conditions aren't necessarily binding It's worth noting that while activities such as the Wayback Machine have had many legal issues, they're mostly centered on copyright, not regarding terms and conditions. A key part of this is that terms and conditions are not law, and they're not binding contract to which you've somehow agreed. Quoting ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible