3

You should probably look up the Open Gaming Liscense (OGL) and what you can or cannot do with respect to it. Generally, classic fantasy monsters (Dragons, Manticores, Sasquatch, Vampires). Are fair use. OGL also allows for creatures that are similar to D&D exclusive monsters to exist so long as the name is changed sufficently. Most "monsters"...


2

I am not sure about the law of India, so I will give an answer for the united-states, which may be of interest to some, and can be compared against an answer regarding India when someone is able to provide that. Those who make or distribute (including sell) infringing copies are liable for damages under US law; those who receive or purchase infringing ...


2

A provision in the contract that the IP is not a work-made-for-hire (WFH) might be effective. But just because something is not a WFH does not mean that the programmer owns the copyright. There are several ways for the purchaser (client) to wind up owning the copyright(s) involved. If the work qualifies as a WFH, either because the creator is in fact an ...


2

It is not legal to copy fonts that happen to be findable on the internet but not licensed for your use: that is copyright infringement. Certain fonts may be automatically sub-licensed to you via the operating system, but let's say that you found a font on a pirate site and downloaded it. That is copyright infringement, which is illegal. Personal-use ...


2

Its possible you already have You would need to check your contract but the default common law position (as detailed in this queensland government article): As a general rule, an employer will own the intellectual property created by its employees in the course of their employment. However, intellectual property that is created by an employee, other than in ...


1

This is going to depend on the specific facts of the matter, and the terms of your existing contract with your employer, if any. It will also depend on what country you are in. If you have an existing contract with your employer that covers IP rights, that will have to be honored. Such a contract might make any work done "within the scope of your ...


1

Ideas are not Intellectual Property Literary and artistic works are (copyright is automatic) and inventions can be (if patented). Ideas are neither. The only way to protect an idea is to keep it secret. If someone learns of your idea and turns it into a novel (copyright) or an actual machine for preventing button batteries from being swallowed by toddlers (...


1

Creative Commons licenses grant more or less limited permission to use works protected by copyright, the details demanding on the particular license selected. They can only grant or restrict permissions to the extent that copyright law permits. Ideas are not subject to copyright protection. If others learn an idea of yours, they are free to use it, including ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible