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You have misunderstood, or the person from Adobe has misinformed you. Under united-states law work done by a fereelancer is initially under copyright by the freelancer, unless there is a valid contract making it a work-made-for-hire (WFH). But even if such a work is not a WFH the copyright may be transferred to the client if a contract provides for such a ...


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Udemy claims that all the videos and course content are copyrighted, but does that also hold for the material of the course? Yes, all the material is copyrighted. Ideas are not, material and content is. it would be really useful to me if I could take a large part of that code ... I want to know if I am allowed, by the law, to use this code for commercial ...


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If S is the owner: yes But S isn't the owner The software the question describes is probably a joint work - the copyright belongs to all of the authors collectively. If the work of individual authors (or sub-groups of them) are identifiable then it’s a collective work and the author(s) of each part can give independent permission for that part. However, ...


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Can I use this code in my personal project and discard the MIT License? Sure. You can use the code however you want. US law permits ordinary use without significant restrictions. If you buy a book, you don't need a license to read it. The problem is, if you wish to duplicate or distribute elements that you didn't author (or do anything else that US law ...


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The MIT license is non-exclusive. If S is the sole copyright holder, S can issue any other non-exclusive license in parallel, and can also stop offering the software under the MIT license. However, open source licenses such the MIT license are generally understood to be irrevocable, so S cannot prevent other people from using the software who already ...


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This pdf Glossary of Terms: Intellectual Property and Related Areas of Law seems pretty comprehensive, and Gov.UK has various links that may assist.


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At least in the US, 99.9% of commercial, non-profit or free news web sites have Terms of Service agreements, which are legally binding documents that come into effect when you access their site by reading or scraping. Those TOSs state what exactly you can do with their content, how you can access it, if you can use their API or not. how you can reuse it, ...


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Copyright Issues Thar Archie comics including the character of Jughead were fist published in 1942. They are still protected by copyright in the US, and almost certifiably in Finland as well, depending on who is considered the original author or authors, as Finland uses a Life+70 term, even for corporate copyrights, when an author can be identified. The name ...


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Short Answer You probably cannot secure any meaningful intellectual property protection for this idea. Intellectual property of this sort, if protected at all, would have to be protected as a business method patent. But such an effort would probably fail. You might be able to trademark a snazzy name for your investment product (compare the trademark for the &...


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There has been lots of U.S. Supreme Court action in patent law, which has collectively mostly weakened patent law, with some exceptions, although there has been little major patent legislation since 2011. (A background report for Congress from the Congressional research service can be found here.) Sandoz Inc. v. Amgen Inc., the U.S. Supreme Court rebuffs the ...


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First: the real answer to your questions is "consult your academic library staff." If this is for a thesis project, then you're presumably affiliated with a college or university, and the librarians at such institutions are used to helping sort out copyright claims and helping researchers obtain the necessary clearances. There are two questions ...


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As BlueDogRanch says, you own the copyright on your picture, and using it without your permission is a breach of your copyright. You can sue them. The details depend on where you are (which is why questions here should always include the jurisdiction). In the UK this would be handled by the Intellectual Property Enterprise Court, probably in its Small Claims ...


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Using a photo of landscaping work not done by the company on that company's website could possibly be construed as false advertising, depending on jurisdiction and other factors. But more relevant to you is the fact that because you took the photo, you own the copyright on the photo, and that business is infringing on your copyright by using the photo ...


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VirusTotal is no different than many internet companies which operate with user-supplied content (i.e. Facebook, Youtube, etc.), and they are no different in the way they protect themselves with a TOS that outlines all aspects of their use of any material contributed or licensed or sold. Their Terms of Service states that users must own the copyright for ...


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