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Are there any legal remedies for the writers of the web comedy series to: keep the "yacht rock" term from being leveraged by parties like Yacht Rock Revue profit from their original coinage trademark their evolving definition/terminology protect their future endeavors from similar behavior, which to me seems at least partly ...


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The laws wherever a copy is made or the work is published If the game is going to be distributed online then the laws of every country where this happens.


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If you are an employee or otherwise doing work for hire, copyright belongs to your employer That’s as a matter of law. However, universities usually have copyright terms in their contract of employment that gives these rights to the creator; you’ll need to check your contract.


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"Backlogged" has no legal status. Under usual contract terms, all intellectual property you generate as part of your employment belongs to your employer. But "intellectual property" is a category of rights, such as patents, trademarks and copyrights. An idea by itself is not intellectual property. "Wouldn't it be great if ..." cannot be owned by a company. ...


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It isn't necessarily "illegal" (in the sense you are committing a crime) but you may be in violation of a verbal contract (which would fall under tort law). Let's take this a bit further. Perhaps Joe Schmoe gave you his debit card information so that you could make deposits for him and he said you could take $5 out for yourself for the trouble. This is a ...


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According to their terms of service, which were accepted when the original account holder signed up, password must not be shared outside of that person's household. If we assume there is nothing in the terms of service preventing you from sharing the password, then the assumption is wrong, so nothing changed. Joe hasn't given you a license to do anything. ...


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Copyright almost certainly exists in the images, since presumably someone took those pictures and so they would own the copyright of those images. However, that doesn't mean you don't own the film, you just that don't own the copyright. You can have it developed to see what's there without copying the images. Just tell the developer you only want the film ...


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It’s unlawful to name goods and services after a trademark in a way that would cause confusion. You are neither a good nor a service.


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The former employer owns the specific code that you wrote, but not the knowledge that acquired. If you copied chunks of code from the original that you wrote, that would be copyright infringement and the company could sue you. Re-using ideas that you got when you wrote this is okay, because ideas are not protected by copyright. It is, however, possible, that ...


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Is there any way one can have their own intellectual property licensed to their own company, such that the person owns that IP and not the company? Yes. This is quite common. The ideal asset protection strategy is to have one company that deals with customers, one that deals with suppliers, one that employs and one that owns property (including ...


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You can't register a trademark in all classes, you can only register in the classes you actually use the name in trade. If you register the trademark in one state then you only have the statutory benefits for registering the trademark in that state. However, you'd also have protections of a unregistered trademark in other states where you're actually using ...


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Yes. A license is a legal form of permission to do something (usually, to use a particular property, whether real or digital or intellectual) and the conditions applied to that use. Different licenses for the same property are extremely common, for example, a free license for hobby or non-profit work and a paid license for commercial usage. Other ...


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You should notify it to Google or Apple. The application is clearly spying on customers. The owner of the application said "we only collect X information" but instead, the application is collecting X + Y. then it breaches the contract.


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As the company implemented it that way, it is a bad idea to notify them. First and foremost, you notify the company of a security issue - you give them a reasonable amount of time to resolve it, and then you publish it. The management may know nothing about how the data is handled, and may rush to fix it when notified - you cannot make an assumption that ...


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Unfortunately the lines are a bit fuzzy, but you shouldn't trip over any doing what you describe. You don't say which country you are in, so the following applies to the USA. Other countries have similar laws but the details vary. Writing or talking about how to play the game is entirely unrestricted; the words are your own and you can say whatever you ...


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Not the free version Your use is commercial so you have to buy the software which (presumably) allows commercial use.


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There's a key phrase you omitted from your quote of 14(e): non-exclusive Qualcomm gets pretty much unlimited rights to use content submitted as part of the contest, but those rights are not granted exclusively. Contest participants are still free to make use of their submissions in almost any way they want, so long as that use doesn't involve granting ...


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No Participants keep all the rights to their Ip. They just give the competition organizer basically the same rights they have themselves.


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There are none Eminent domain is the doctrine that government can seize a person's property and convert it to public use. IP is just property and it can be acquired by government on the same basis that any other property can be. The 5th amendment requires that this requires payment of just compensation and that the appropriation is for public use (which is ...


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Eminent domain is not a concern for you, under the normal understanding of what it refers to. The government might take your house for a public purpose, and given the nature of land, you wouldn't have that land anymore. The government would not have the power to compel production of your research results through ordinary land-grab means. That does not mean ...


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