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Besides any disclaimer of copyright ownership of your future work (like the FSF document), the situation might be that you have already started writing code for the project. If so, and if your employee agreement or the force of law in your state dictates that work done on your own time is work for hire under copyright law then they already hold the copyright ...


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The Free Software Foundation faced the same issue, as many contributors needed disclaimers from their employers. Luckily, it's not difficult. Their template: Yoyodyne, Inc., hereby disclaims all copyright interest in the program “Woodpecker” (which deconstructs trees) written by James Hacker. signature of Moe Ghoul 1 April 1989 Moe Ghoul, ...


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If your contract for the job includes some kind of confidentiality clause prohibiting revealing communications related to the job, then yes it is prohibited. But I have never seen any such thing: check your paperwork. Even if somebody writes at the bottom of their email "This email is confidential and cannot be distributed to anybody other than the intended ...


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In terms of owning copyright of AI output, there's no definitive answer. But, let's discuss anyways, since I'm assuming you wanted more than "I don't know." First let's set the baseline. Thanks to the Infopaq decision, we know that the standard for copyrightability is an "author's own intellectual creation" and that this is uniform throughout the EU. ...


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Sure, it can But it doesn’t mean what you think it means It means that if you bring IP into the company then you will indemnify your employer if it turns out you nicked it. So if you had worked at Oracle and then worked at Google, you would indemnify Google if you used great swathes of Oracle’s IP in your work at Google.


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all inventions that Employee invents, conceives of, creates, develops, or reduces to practice Things that the employee acquires but doesn’t create themselves are not covered. Also, this clause appears to only apply to inventions, that is, things that are patentable. Other IP (e.g. copyright) is not captured.


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[...] Also, there was no license int the starter files. [...] You wrote it... they have no license! Having no license, they don't qualify as open source software, so theoretically you should actually not use them. I guess they won't sue you for using them to start your projects, but I guess they might want to if you use them to make and publish ...


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