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It is not an either–or. You may have certain rights under both CCPA and GDPR, but they have rather different mechanisms for determining their scope. When does the CCPA apply? CCPA applies to certain businesses and consumers. It covers any business (regardless of legal structure) that that does business in the State of California and has a certain scale. A ...


13

Does this mean all countries law applies to it? Basically yes. If the videos are in english and are about science in general does this mean if some country some day bans ( imprisonment ) science videos or use of a specific colour in videos can they extraterritorialy enforce this imprisonment if they are in some other country like USA or India? With ...


8

No Because it’s patented in country A, it is not novel anywhere in the world. That is, the patent in country A is “prior art” that would disqualify it from being patented anywhere else. The original patent holder can patent it elsewhere because patent law has an exception for that.


7

You cannot stop the claim. But the good news is that claims of jurisdiction by many countries are routinely ignored by many other countries. So enforcement attempts might fall short. I've written things here that might get me into real trouble with the authorities of North Korea if I ever traveled there and if they were able to match my real-world identity ...


4

Many We know, that YouTubers can sue each other using the US Court system since the "Akila Obviously v Sargon of Akkad" - Akilah Saidah Kamaria Hughes is a New Yorker, Carl Benjamin is a British citizen. Their Lawsuit ended in a US court, and Mr. Benjamin won under Fair Use. We also know that Youtube offers the ability to flag videos as violating ...


3

That a company (C) has a website that can be accessed from a given county does not mean that the company operates in that country. If C is located in country A, markets and advertises to country A, offers products designed to appeal in country A, has its site only in the primary language of country A, uses servers located in country A, and has all its assets ...


3

Yes More exactly, nations will not regard places outside of their physical limits as outside of their jurisdictions. Overview Traditionally, a nation has regarded any ship flying its flag as under its jurisdiction, and a place where it may enforce its laws. More recently, many nations will undertake to enforce laws in cases where their citizens are the ...


2

The thing is: there is nothing to prevent a sovereign state from making laws whatever it wishes (subject to international agreements/treaties/conventions it signed, if any, and the extent it is prepared to flout those). A country could make a law that assumes jurisdiction over whatever wherever — be it international waters, Mars, Alpha Centauri or even just ...


2

The US Constitution has no bearing on the Nuremberg Tribunals The tribunals were not conducted under US law, they were conducted under an international treaty going by the snappy title of No. 251 Agreement by the Government of the United Kindom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, the Government of the United States of America, the Provisional Government ...


2

It would come down to the question if the US Constitution binds the US government in how they enter and apply instruments like the London Charter aka Nuremberg Charter or for that matter the unconditional surrender agreement with Germany. Neither of them is a law or bill, exactly. There have been plenty of cases where the US found it legal (constitutional?) ...


1

There is no such thing as a jurisdiction free place on earth If you are on a boat, you are in the jurisdiction of the boat's registered country or the country. If it is not registered, the law of the owner's country applies. If you are off a boat, you are a citizen of your country and it has jurisdiction over you. No spot of permanently dry land known to ...


1

Whatever the hypothetical new law is, the lowest-hanging fruit is Youtube, where India could take action against Youtube. The Federal Trade Commission did so w.r.t. COPPA violations in the US, and Youtube settled. Since Youtube is a US company and the FTC is a US federal agency, had this gone to court and had the FTC prevailed, the courts would have ordered ...


1

Generally, a multinational company is subject to the laws and regulations of the country where they do buisness, so it will depend on the nature of the country. In Youtube's case, some videos may not be available in countries where it cannot for a host of reasons show the video. This is why so many big Youtubers actually work do adverts for VPNs, which, ...


1

An Independent State is a: nation, country, or state in which its residents and population, or some portion thereof, exercise self-government, and usually sovereignty, over its territory. Whereas a Free State is: occasionally used in the official titles of some states throughout the world with varying meanings depending on the context. In principle, the ...


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