17

No, it's not illegal... Ads are shown as a contract between the site that hosts it and the advertising company. The contract does not stipulate that customers need to buy something, in fact, the contract can't force the customer to buy anything! At best, the contract can pay the hosting site based on the ad being shown, clicked, or any sale made after it. ......


9

That's probably not a violation of that rule...but that's not your biggest problem. The most reasonable interpretation of that line in the terms is that you can't use a bot or do anything that looks kind of like using a bot. So if you and all your friends used a script to enter your picks for you, that wouldn't be allowed. Manually entering picks based on ...


8

Legalities aside... You will most likely achieve the opposite with an interesting side effect. The campaign will prove to be very effective (as per the number of clicks), but the side owner may be penalized in some cases for receiving too many clicks. In the past I've had a colleague who used Google Ads on his website. A competitor wanted to harm his website,...


4

If the person uses that name "in commerce" then it could be a violation of the "Amazon Prime" trademark. Trademark law is often based on the "common sense" doctrine. The question the court would ask themselves is "could a common sense person come to the conclusion that this user represents the company Amazon.com Inc.". ...


3

Assuming Chegg own the copyright, then they can restrict the activities that copyright protects The statement you quote is no more or less than the rights granted to them by copyright law. Basically, it's their stuff, they get to decide how you can use it. However, that does not necessarily mean that the uses that you have nominated are prohibited. For that, ...


2

While it most likely is not illegal (because it is solicited access), it's not likely to be effective. Advertising is one of the components of the online world that is most responsive to circumstances. Advertisers will detect that people who are "similar to you" (by whatever metrics are known about you) are likely to access their sites and not ...


1

This question is somewhat answered here: A commonly discussed scenario where implied licenses are destined to play a major role is on the World Wide Web. When a Web page is viewed in a Web browser, the page is downloaded through the Internet and placed on the user's screen. It is clear that a copy of the Web page is being made by the user. It is also clear ...


1

Copyright restricts making copies, it does not restrict using copies you legally have When I buy a book, I’m allowed to read it, put it on my bookshelf, take it off the bookshelf and put it on my coffee table, take it from there and lose it under the seat of my car etc. what I’m not allowed to do is copy it. When I access a web page, I’m allowed to display ...


1

You cannot copy or imitate assets that fall under copyright protection, and you must not cause confusion with competitor's websites. So for example you can't copy Google's CSS files or SVG icons, and you cannot imitate their site design so closely that a reasonable visitor would think that your site was a Google site. Furthermore, the appearance/design of ...


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