Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
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Accused of what? Clearly stating under which conditions you (the accuser) would earn money by doing nothing more than staying online for 7 days? You agreed to these conditions, but did not fulfill them, so the scammer (the accused) was the one that earned money for doing nothing. The scammer had the same motive as you had, earning money for doing ...


17

Yes The directors of a company have a fiduciary duty to act within the law for the benefit of their shareholders - not to their customers, not to the government, not to the environment and not to the public. A lawsuit against the company will incur financial loss irrespective of if it is won or lost. It is difficult to see how it is in the shareholder's ...


15

This may be a good faith and fair dealing violation which would give the victim a civil cause of action to recover at least his original investment.


6

This would be illegal in Australia (Criminal Code Act 1995 part 10.7: any unauthorised impairment of electronic communication to or from a computer), the US (Computer Fraud and Abuse Act) and any other jurisdiction that I can think of. There is no exception allowing vigilante action in case a person has a reasonable belief that the material on a website is ...


4

Your court will surely lack jurisdiction against an unidentified scammer in a foreign country hiding behind a sequence of VPNs. Unless by some wild application of both skill and coincidience, you identify the scammer in a nation from which you have a chance of filing litigation. Yes, you would have a case that the requirement to keep a web browser page ...


2

If the communication verifiably came from the PhotoClaim attorneys, then the answer is more strongly in the "must pay" column, whereas otherwise it could be a scam. It appears that they require confirmation from clients that a use is infringing. They offer to negotiate in case the fee is unaffordable, but their business is to protect their client's rights. ...


1

The legality and generally accepted ethics for security professionals differ on this point. From a legal perspective, unless John Doe has signed a legal agreement to not reveal the information (most commonly a Non-Disclosure Agreement, or NDA) or has a responsibility to keep the information private, there is no legal penalty for revealing truthful ...


1

You can do anything you want with cookies Because they are residing on your own data processing equipment, using resources on that equipment, which belongs to you; and the company has not signed a contract nor paid a consideration for those services and resources. I for one wipe ALL my cookies at intervals of my choice. You are also allowed to hop ...


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