15

It seems like some law must have been breached during the sharing of this information? Possibly, even probably. The scrutiny of your personal account in order to glean personal data (your IP address) and then using that personal data to match accounts may contravene Recital 50 of the GDPR: The processing of personal data for purposes other than those for ...


14

Of course it's legal. Hyperlinking to an unaffiliated website in no way "determine[s] the means and processing of data." The person who makes these determinations is the person running the website. If I link to Microsoft's website, that doesn't give me any control over how Microsoft processes data on the website.


8

GDPR defines consent like this in Art 4(11): ‘consent’ of the data subject means any freely given, specific, informed and unambiguous indication of the data subject’s wishes by which he or she, by a statement or by a clear affirmative action, signifies agreement to the processing of personal data relating to him or her; Further conditions on consent are ...


8

It seems like some law must have been breached during the sharing of this information? No. A scrutiny of your pseudonymous account would reveal that you used it for advancing your own business interests. That use forfeits the protections for which the GDPR was intended. The Terms of Use very likely contain a provision to the effect of disclosing account ...


4

You can’t do this LinkedIn ToS prohibit: b. Develop, support or use software, devices, scripts, robots or any other means or processes (including crawlers, browser plugins and add-ons or any other technology) to scrape the Services or otherwise copy profiles and other data from the Services; c. Override any security feature or bypass or circumvent any ...


3

No These are derivative works and making them is copyright breach. Doing this as a hobby or even for the entertainment of friends in private is likely fair use. Distribution or performance in public (monitored or not) is likely not fair use and you would need a licence. Here is a summary of the relevant law in australia.


3

can it be construed as a violation of 66F clause 2 if we try to circumvent the rate limit even though the information is on public domain? No, unless the element of intent to threaten [...] or strike terror can be proved. I'm assuming that by "clause 2" you mean the excerpt you posted. Although circumventing the limit of API calls sounds in "...


2

Y chooses Because the situation engages multiple jurisdictions, the plaintiff choose which to initiate their action in. Considerations involve convenience and which laws most favour their case - for example, no one pursues a defamation case in the USA if they have any other choice because of the USA’s outlier views on free speech. The defendant can argue ...


2

There is a possible difference, but it is not clear what the outcome would be in case you got sued. The technical fact is that playing and transmitting sound by computer involves copying. 17 USC 106 says Subject to sections 107 through 122, the owner of copyright under this title has the exclusive rights to do and to authorize any of the following: (1) to ...


2

Here is the form, for US District courts. It starts by saying YOU ARE COMMANDED to produce at the time, date, and place set forth below the following books, papers,documents, data, or other objects It is basically irrelevant how many nanoseconds it takes to obtain the data being subpoenaed. Legally relevant variables are (1) whether a motion to quash the ...


2

If Metropolis is an infringing copy of Gotham you have no right to use it In effect, you are using Gotham and you don’t have a licence to do so. You can be sued.


1

GDPR is very specific about who the data controllers and data processes are, in a given process. By simply linking to a site, you do not qualify as either a data controller or data processor. https://www.gdpreu.org/the-regulation/key-concepts/data-controllers-and-processors/ A data controller is a key decision makers. They have the overall say and control ...


1

After having looked at many cookie consent forms, of major companies and organisations, I've noticed an obvious pattern in how the design of the form is used to trick the user. Here's an example of the news website of the Belgian state-sponsored national broadcaster VRT: The list of additional cookies, and whether they are enabled or not is clear enough; ...


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