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2

if he provides me with copyrighted material that I add to the website, would I be liable? No. Instead, your friend would be liable both directly and vicariously. Direct liability would arise from the fact that your friend himself sends to you the contents he wants in the website. Vicarious liability stems from you making the website on behalf of your friend,...


1

The only concern is have is, if he provides me with copyrighted material that I add to the website, would I be liable? Yes. What kind of contract could I have him agree to, for example is this where indemnification comes in? Yes, they can indemnify you. But you would have to sue your friend to enforce this if you get sued and if they go bankrupt you ...


4

It isn't necessarily "illegal" (in the sense you are committing a crime) but you may be in violation of a verbal contract (which would fall under tort law). Let's take this a bit further. Perhaps Joe Schmoe gave you his debit card information so that you could make deposits for him and he said you could take $5 out for yourself for the trouble. This is a ...


-1

According to their terms of service, which were accepted when the original account holder signed up, password must not be shared outside of that person's household. If we assume there is nothing in the terms of service preventing you from sharing the password, then the assumption is wrong, so nothing changed. Joe hasn't given you a license to do anything. ...


3

You mean like this? Of course, a website can charge you to access its pages; many do. And yes, clicking on an "I agree" button can form a valid contract (just visiting the website can't). Historically, the law has adopted the position that if you sign it (including by clicking "I agree") you read it, you understood it and you agreed to it. It's hard to ...


0

Basically nothing, most likely. I am not a lawyer, but I think it's most likely that very little would need to be changed to be counted as "transformative", at least in America. Recently, in the case of Carl Benjamin (Sargon of Akkad) vs Akilah Hughes, it was found that Benjamin's video "SJW Levels of Awareness" was transformative Fair Use, even though it ...


2

Not very novel What you are talking about is a derivative work. This is arguably the most famous example: It's an interesting example because Leonardo da Vinci did not have copyright in the original but Marcel Duchamp and Francis Picabia do have copyright in the derivative. Even though the changes are physically small, they are enough. A crucial factor ...


3

You can licence your copyright under as many licences as you like to as many people as you like It's your copyright - you can do what you want with it. What you can't do is give someone an exclusive licence and then give licences to others - that would be a breach of contract with the exclusive licensee. How you let people know about the available ...


1

Sorry, I'll have to opt for a no-quotes answer. The question is, does your answer have the scintilla of creativity required for copyright protection? That creativity arises from identifying relevant text from elsewhere, deciding how much is relevant, eliminating superfluous verbiage, collecting a relevant set of such texts (assuming that the parts of an ...


1

It isn’t legal If people want to send you stuff, they are free to do so. You don’t have to pay for it.


15

Yes, GDPR applies: you are a data controller established/living in the UK or are offering services to people in the UK you fall under the material scope of the GDPR. The Art 2(2)(c) exemption for “purely personal or household activity” does not apply since you're offering the service to the public. You must consider GDPR compliance here. This is especially ...


4

Not the free version Your use is commercial so you have to buy the software which (presumably) allows commercial use.


1

I fear that you have 'jumped the gun' - I think you and your colleagues in the legal/compliance department should first meet to discuss your project. You must facilitate their understanding of the project so that you and they can discuss your options and obligations under GDPR and other such rules in your jurisdiction. It may be the case that this project ...


1

This isn’t anonomization under the GDPR The reason IP addresses are personal data is because they are unique to an individual. So are your hashes.


0

Taking a screenshot on your computer is legal; sharing it may not be It's your computer; you can take as many screenshots as you like. You can keep these and use them for your own purposes including legal purposes. Where you get into legal trouble is if you share a communication where there was a reasonable expectation of privacy. If I send you a message ...


1

Legal unless you violate copyright. Screenshots will probably be fair use. The manuals/how-tos need to be your originals, not copies from anywhere.


0

I think all these are "Personal Data" according to GDPR (right?) Can the data controller or another person, "with reasonable means reasonably likely to be used," use that data alone or in combination with other data to identify a natural person? If yes, it is personal data within the meaning of the GDPR. If no, it is not personal data within the meaning ...


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