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3

The authority for the ban is laid out here: all that is required is putting the company on the Commerce Department's entity list. More specifically, under 50 USC 1701 there must be an unusual and extraordinary threat, which has its source in whole or substantial part outside the United States, to the national security, foreign policy, or economy of the ...


2

He has that power, as spelled out here, relying primarily on 50 U.S.C. 1701. This executive order already exists, so one path is to simply put Tik Tok on the Commerce Department's entity list. The specific list as of July 22 is here – you can find Huawei already on the list, for example. A First Amendment lawsuit is not likely to succeed, since there is no ...


1

I interpret this as a general information question about website liability law in Russia, and not a request for specific legal advice. Many questions depend on detailed knowledge of how the Russian legal system works, good luck with that. Here is a summary of the 8 main categories of legal concern. You should not allow copyright infringement on your forum. ...


3

Do I have to pay taxes if I register the domain but the website income belongs to someone else? No. The person or company who runs, and/or profits from, the business is the entity under obligation to pay all the applicable taxes: Value Added Tax, income tax, corporate tax, and so forth. Unless you charge a significant amount therefor (see the comments), the ...


4

Your friend's relationship with the game company is one of contract. You don't say what the contract terms are, so it's impossible to say whether they were breached by your friend or the company. In any case, it is likely that the only remedy your friend could seek is damages, probably limited to whatever outstanding portion of the subscription they have not ...


2

You need proof beyond reasonable doubt. The court will get expert witnesses to figure out who strong the evidence is. First, someone will tell the court that if your home IP address has been used, how strong evidence it is that your computer or phone was used. And then if your computer or phone was used for a crime, it depends on the situation how much ...


2

It depends. If the prosecution proves beyond reasonable doubt that noone else could use that IP address at that particular time then yes. But can it prove so? Maybe yes. Maybe not. Depends on the results of forensic examination of the device, network traffic, any other corroborating evidence etc.


1

In the EU: In Ryanair Ltd v PR Aviation BV [2015] the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) held that subject to national law the owner of a publicly accessible database is free to determine by contract the conditions of its use. In other words the owner is free to set the T&Cs and you must abide by them or not use the website. You can ensure you ...


2

The reason for that is that according to GDPR explanation on EU website under GDPR company collecting my personal data and using it for automated decision making should inform me about that and have me agree to it. Only if the basis for processing is consent. The GDPR provides 6 legal basis for data processing - consent is only one of them. If their basis ...


0

Please understand that thieving or scamming isn't illegal and therefore I can neither punish the other player nor compensate you for your lost ***** Coins. It sounds like their customer service's position is that all of the conduct took place in the game and that the in game conduct of the other player wasn't the kind of rule violation that would justify ...


4

It's not your job to investigate crimes and find the culprit In general, companies have to (and do) cooperate with investigation of crimes - providing evidence, identifying people, taking corrective actions. But it is not their duty to investigate crimes. That happens through the legal system; the police investigate crimes and courts issue warrants/subpoenas ...


5

Possibly The game company has almost certainly excluded liability under the contract you entered. There may be some consumer protection that you have that they cannot exclude - I don’t know enough about German law to meaningfully comment. Notwithstanding, if you were to initiate legal action against the, as yet, unknown wrongdoer, you could subpoena the ...


-1

Is the game company required to help you... and can you require them to take action? First, read the Terms of Service for the game site; it is a legally binding contract. it will state that the owners of the game are not responsible for theft, scams, lost virtual coins, prizes, etc., and have no responsibility other than providing the game site. You and ...


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