Hot answers tagged

9

No Governments have sovereign power. Subject to constitutional and legislative constraints, governments can change laws as they wish. That includes legislative changes and administrative policies. Most governments tend not to use this power arbitrarily because it tends to make investors wary - economists call this sovereign risk. Like any other risk, the ...


7

You are a British citizen: Born in the UK between 1 January 1983 and 1 October 2000 Whether you’re a British citizen depends on where your parents were from and their circumstances. There are different rules if, when you were born: at least one of your parents was a British or Irish citizen at least one of your parents was a citizen of an EU or EEA country ...


5

Based on Irish law, specifically the Irish Nationality and Citizenship Act 1956, can I live abroad after naturalizing as an Irish citizen and retain my citizenship just by filling that form? Yes, subject of course to factual disputes. The statute (as amended) provides that this revocation is not possible when the citizen has "registered annually in ...


4

I cannot find any relevant judgements from June 2007 that were published by the Irish High Court using the judgement finder. However, over 50 similar cases were issued at the High Court regarding this matter, and all but 10 were settled prior to a bundle of four cases being issued before the High Court which ultimately referred the matter to the European ...


3

There's an answer at Irish Citizens Information, complete with a chart. First, it doesn't matter if the Irish ancestor was living in the Republic or in Northern Ireland. However, the ancestral right only extends to grandchildren unless you were born after 2015. Otherwise, your parent must have claimed Irish citizenship before you were born.


3

Article 41.3.3 of the 1937 Irish Constitution said: No person whose marriage has been dissolved under the civil law of any other State but is a subsisting valid marriage under the law for the time being in force within the jurisdiction of the Government and Parliament established by this Constitution shall be capable of contracting a valid marriage within ...


3

One official form of ID should be enough. Two pieces of ID is more than most people ever carry. And not selling to you because you’re black would be illegal discrimination. But that would be hard to prove. The most likely explanation is stupidity. Or lack of training. Might be an employee who is already deep into overtime, or just not mentally present. Some ...


2

Your child probably does not qualify for Irish birth citizenship since residence of the parent on a student visa does not count. Your child probably does qualify for Indian citizenship since you are Indian and/or for Bangladeshi citizenship since the mother is Bangladeshi. Applying for both would make the child a dual citizen, which appears to be discouraged ...


2

As an EU Citizen (and your EU family members), you are automatically a permanent resident after 5 years. You can apply for a permanent resident card to document this. Such a card would document the fact that you fulfill the 5 years required for naturalization, should you wish to also become an Irish citizen. Sources: Permanent residence (after 5 years) for ...


2

A judge ruled in July that this requirement may only be satisfied by 365 or 366 days of physical presence in Ireland. An appeal was scheduled for this month. It does not seem that the rule is different for EU citizens, but it was different before July, because there had been a policy in place that considered short trips abroad not to interrupt residence. ...


1

Now does it mean that after 5 years of residence in Ireland, I (EU national) and my non-EU family members should apply for PERMANENT RESIDENCE OR IRISH CITIZENSHIP? It seems to mean that you may each choose one option or the other. Why would one apply for PR when they can apply for Irish citizenship after 5 years of residence? One possibility: the current ...


1

The word "perimeter" must be read in line with the Interpretation Act 2005, Section 5(1) if there is any doubt about the meaning of the word: 5.—(1) In construing a provision of any Act (other than a provision that relates to the imposition of a penal or other sanction)— (a) that is obscure or ambiguous, or (b) that on a literal interpretation ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible